Workplace settings and wellbeing: Greenspace use and views contribute to employee wellbeing at peri-urban business sites

Kathryn Gilchrist, Caroline Brown, Alicia Montarzino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low density business developments are a near ubiquitous feature of peri-urban landscapes in the UK and in other developed countries, however little is known about how workers relate to open space in this particular type of working environment. Person-environment relationships in five urban fringe science parks in central Scotland were investigated through a survey of employees (. N=. 366). Specifically, the study sought to explore the impact of viewing and using greenspace at these knowledge-sector workplaces on employee wellbeing. The results of a series of multiple regression analyses indicated that both use of the open space and views of some vegetation types, namely trees, lawn and shrubs or flowering plants, were positively and independently associated with self-reported wellbeing levels. This research provides new insight into the extent to which workplace greenspace contributes to employee wellbeing, whilst controlling for exposure to greenspace outside of the workplace context. Also, by investigating relationships between wellbeing and the particular physical features seen in views, the research provides evidence on how workplaces might be designed to incorporate restorative window views. These findings have relevance both for the planning and design of peri-urban business sites and for the design of interventions to promote employee wellbeing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-40
Number of pages9
JournalLandscape and Urban Planning
Volume138
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2015

Keywords

  • Employee wellbeing
  • Green space
  • Restorative environments
  • Science park
  • Workplace

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