Why set-comparison is vital in early number learning

Kevin Muldoon, Charlie Lewis, Norman Freeman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Cardinal numbers serve two logically complementary functions. They tell us how many things are within a set, and they tell us whether two sets are equivalent or not. Current modelling of counting focuses on the representation of number sufficient for the within-set function; however, such representations are necessary but not sufficient for the equivalence function. We propose that there needs to be some consideration of how the link between counting and set-comparison is achieved during formative years of numeracy. We work through the implications to identify how this crucial change in numerical understanding occurs. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)203-208
    Number of pages6
    JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
    Volume13
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2009

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    Muldoon, Kevin ; Lewis, Charlie ; Freeman, Norman. / Why set-comparison is vital in early number learning. In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 2009 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 203-208.
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    Why set-comparison is vital in early number learning. / Muldoon, Kevin; Lewis, Charlie; Freeman, Norman.

    In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 13, No. 5, 05.2009, p. 203-208.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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