What do applications of systems thinking accident analysis methods tell us about accident causation? A systematic review of applications between 1990 and 2018

Adam Hulme, Neville A. Stanton, Guy H. Walker, Patrick Waterson, Paul M. Salmon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Introduction: This systematic review examines and reports on peer reviewed studies that have applied systems thinking accident analysis methods to better understand the cause of accidents in a diverse range of sociotechnical systems contexts.

Methods: Four databases (PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Web of Science) were searched for published articles during the dates 01 January 1990 to 31 July 2018, inclusive, for original peer reviewed journal articles. Eligible studies applied AcciMap, the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), the Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Processes (STAMP) method, including Causal Analysis based on STAMP (CAST), and the Functional Resonance Analysis Method (FRAM). Outcomes included accidents ranging from major events to minor incidents.

Results: A total of 73 articles were included. There were 20, 43, six, and four studies in the AcciMap, HFACS, STAMP-CAST, and FRAM methods categories, respectively. The most common accident contexts were aviation, maritime, rail, public health, and mining. A greater number of contributory factors were found at the lower end of the sociotechnical systems analysed, including the equipment/technology, human/staff, and operating processes levels. A majority of studies used supplementary approaches to enhance the analytical capacity of base applications.

Conclusions: Systems thinking accident analysis methods have been popular for close to two decades and have been applied in a diverse range of sociotechnical systems contexts. A number of research-based recommendations are proposed, including the need to upgrade incident reporting systems and further explore opportunities around the development of novel accident analysis approaches.

LanguageEnglish
Pages164-183
Number of pages20
JournalSafety Science
Volume117
Early online date20 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Systems Analysis
Causality
Accidents
accident
sociotechnical system
causal analysis
functional analysis
Theoretical Models
Factor analysis
Human engineering
factor analysis
incident
Statistical Factor Analysis
cause of accident
major event
process analysis
reporting system
Aviation
air traffic
Risk Management

Keywords

  • Accident analysis
  • AcciMap
  • FRAM
  • HFACS
  • Sociotechnical systems
  • STAMP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Safety Research
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{6f4713f014fc42eda5b6763fdb748624,
title = "What do applications of systems thinking accident analysis methods tell us about accident causation? A systematic review of applications between 1990 and 2018",
abstract = "Introduction: This systematic review examines and reports on peer reviewed studies that have applied systems thinking accident analysis methods to better understand the cause of accidents in a diverse range of sociotechnical systems contexts.Methods: Four databases (PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Web of Science) were searched for published articles during the dates 01 January 1990 to 31 July 2018, inclusive, for original peer reviewed journal articles. Eligible studies applied AcciMap, the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), the Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Processes (STAMP) method, including Causal Analysis based on STAMP (CAST), and the Functional Resonance Analysis Method (FRAM). Outcomes included accidents ranging from major events to minor incidents.Results: A total of 73 articles were included. There were 20, 43, six, and four studies in the AcciMap, HFACS, STAMP-CAST, and FRAM methods categories, respectively. The most common accident contexts were aviation, maritime, rail, public health, and mining. A greater number of contributory factors were found at the lower end of the sociotechnical systems analysed, including the equipment/technology, human/staff, and operating processes levels. A majority of studies used supplementary approaches to enhance the analytical capacity of base applications.Conclusions: Systems thinking accident analysis methods have been popular for close to two decades and have been applied in a diverse range of sociotechnical systems contexts. A number of research-based recommendations are proposed, including the need to upgrade incident reporting systems and further explore opportunities around the development of novel accident analysis approaches.",
keywords = "Accident analysis, AcciMap, FRAM, HFACS, Sociotechnical systems, STAMP",
author = "Adam Hulme and Stanton, {Neville A.} and Walker, {Guy H.} and Patrick Waterson and Salmon, {Paul M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.ssci.2019.04.016",
language = "English",
volume = "117",
pages = "164--183",
journal = "Safety Science",
issn = "0925-7535",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

What do applications of systems thinking accident analysis methods tell us about accident causation? A systematic review of applications between 1990 and 2018. / Hulme, Adam; Stanton, Neville A.; Walker, Guy H.; Waterson, Patrick; Salmon, Paul M.

In: Safety Science, Vol. 117, 08.2019, p. 164-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - What do applications of systems thinking accident analysis methods tell us about accident causation? A systematic review of applications between 1990 and 2018

AU - Hulme, Adam

AU - Stanton, Neville A.

AU - Walker, Guy H.

AU - Waterson, Patrick

AU - Salmon, Paul M.

PY - 2019/8

Y1 - 2019/8

N2 - Introduction: This systematic review examines and reports on peer reviewed studies that have applied systems thinking accident analysis methods to better understand the cause of accidents in a diverse range of sociotechnical systems contexts.Methods: Four databases (PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Web of Science) were searched for published articles during the dates 01 January 1990 to 31 July 2018, inclusive, for original peer reviewed journal articles. Eligible studies applied AcciMap, the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), the Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Processes (STAMP) method, including Causal Analysis based on STAMP (CAST), and the Functional Resonance Analysis Method (FRAM). Outcomes included accidents ranging from major events to minor incidents.Results: A total of 73 articles were included. There were 20, 43, six, and four studies in the AcciMap, HFACS, STAMP-CAST, and FRAM methods categories, respectively. The most common accident contexts were aviation, maritime, rail, public health, and mining. A greater number of contributory factors were found at the lower end of the sociotechnical systems analysed, including the equipment/technology, human/staff, and operating processes levels. A majority of studies used supplementary approaches to enhance the analytical capacity of base applications.Conclusions: Systems thinking accident analysis methods have been popular for close to two decades and have been applied in a diverse range of sociotechnical systems contexts. A number of research-based recommendations are proposed, including the need to upgrade incident reporting systems and further explore opportunities around the development of novel accident analysis approaches.

AB - Introduction: This systematic review examines and reports on peer reviewed studies that have applied systems thinking accident analysis methods to better understand the cause of accidents in a diverse range of sociotechnical systems contexts.Methods: Four databases (PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Web of Science) were searched for published articles during the dates 01 January 1990 to 31 July 2018, inclusive, for original peer reviewed journal articles. Eligible studies applied AcciMap, the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), the Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Processes (STAMP) method, including Causal Analysis based on STAMP (CAST), and the Functional Resonance Analysis Method (FRAM). Outcomes included accidents ranging from major events to minor incidents.Results: A total of 73 articles were included. There were 20, 43, six, and four studies in the AcciMap, HFACS, STAMP-CAST, and FRAM methods categories, respectively. The most common accident contexts were aviation, maritime, rail, public health, and mining. A greater number of contributory factors were found at the lower end of the sociotechnical systems analysed, including the equipment/technology, human/staff, and operating processes levels. A majority of studies used supplementary approaches to enhance the analytical capacity of base applications.Conclusions: Systems thinking accident analysis methods have been popular for close to two decades and have been applied in a diverse range of sociotechnical systems contexts. A number of research-based recommendations are proposed, including the need to upgrade incident reporting systems and further explore opportunities around the development of novel accident analysis approaches.

KW - Accident analysis

KW - AcciMap

KW - FRAM

KW - HFACS

KW - Sociotechnical systems

KW - STAMP

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064458326&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ssci.2019.04.016

DO - 10.1016/j.ssci.2019.04.016

M3 - Review article

VL - 117

SP - 164

EP - 183

JO - Safety Science

T2 - Safety Science

JF - Safety Science

SN - 0925-7535

ER -