What difference do rights make?: Decentering the governance of children’s outdoor play in Scotland and Wales

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

Local government services are generally considered either child or universal. Town planning falls into the latter category, and neglecting the land use needs of children is common practice. This chapter brings this to the fore, to explore how elite narratives have framed how children should be provided for, and how local government actors interpret, resist and/or use their own narratives to steer their practise. By taking a rights-based perspective, it draws on policy analysis and interviews with practitioners in Scotland and Wales to ask whether children’s rights help construct shared narratives that aid collaboration between child and non-child services.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationDecentring Urban Governance
Subtitle of host publicationNarratives, Resistance and Contestation
EditorsMark Bevir, Kim McKee, Peter Matthews
PublisherRoutledge
Pages89-114
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9781138229372
StatePublished - 18 Sep 2017

Publication series

NameRoutledge Studies in Governance and Public Policy

Fingerprint

governance
narrative
town planning
children's rights
elite
land use
interview

Cite this

Wood, J. (2017). What difference do rights make? Decentering the governance of children’s outdoor play in Scotland and Wales. In M. Bevir, K. McKee, & P. Matthews (Eds.), Decentring Urban Governance : Narratives, Resistance and Contestation (pp. 89-114). (Routledge Studies in Governance and Public Policy). Routledge.
Wood, Jenny. / What difference do rights make? Decentering the governance of children’s outdoor play in Scotland and Wales. Decentring Urban Governance : Narratives, Resistance and Contestation. editor / Mark Bevir ; Kim McKee ; Peter Matthews. Routledge, 2017. pp. 89-114 (Routledge Studies in Governance and Public Policy).
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Wood, J 2017, What difference do rights make? Decentering the governance of children’s outdoor play in Scotland and Wales. in M Bevir, K McKee & P Matthews (eds), Decentring Urban Governance : Narratives, Resistance and Contestation. Routledge Studies in Governance and Public Policy, Routledge, pp. 89-114.

What difference do rights make? Decentering the governance of children’s outdoor play in Scotland and Wales. / Wood, Jenny.

Decentring Urban Governance : Narratives, Resistance and Contestation. ed. / Mark Bevir; Kim McKee; Peter Matthews. Routledge, 2017. p. 89-114 (Routledge Studies in Governance and Public Policy).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Wood J. What difference do rights make? Decentering the governance of children’s outdoor play in Scotland and Wales. In Bevir M, McKee K, Matthews P, editors, Decentring Urban Governance : Narratives, Resistance and Contestation. Routledge. 2017. p. 89-114. (Routledge Studies in Governance and Public Policy).