Welfare regimes, social values and homelessness

Comparing responses to marginalised groups in six European countries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper examines the exposure to homelessness of socially marginalised groups to understand better the applicability of, and limits to, welfare regime analysis. A vignette methodology is deployed in six European countries to interrogate and compare responses to marginalised groups at high risk of homelessness, including people with substance misuse problems, ex-offenders, young people excluded from the family home, migrants, and women fleeing domestic violence. The evidence suggests that a range of values embedded in national political cultures – including familialism, social cohesion, individuality, personal responsibility, and personal liberty, as well as egalitarianism - impact on models of intervention and outcomes for specific marginalised groups in ways which cannot be straightforwardly predicted from conventional welfare regime analysis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-234
Number of pages20
JournalHousing Studies
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Homelessness
  • Europe
  • vignettes
  • welfare regimes
  • social marginalisation
  • values

Cite this

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abstract = "This paper examines the exposure to homelessness of socially marginalised groups to understand better the applicability of, and limits to, welfare regime analysis. A vignette methodology is deployed in six European countries to interrogate and compare responses to marginalised groups at high risk of homelessness, including people with substance misuse problems, ex-offenders, young people excluded from the family home, migrants, and women fleeing domestic violence. The evidence suggests that a range of values embedded in national political cultures – including familialism, social cohesion, individuality, personal responsibility, and personal liberty, as well as egalitarianism - impact on models of intervention and outcomes for specific marginalised groups in ways which cannot be straightforwardly predicted from conventional welfare regime analysis.",
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AB - This paper examines the exposure to homelessness of socially marginalised groups to understand better the applicability of, and limits to, welfare regime analysis. A vignette methodology is deployed in six European countries to interrogate and compare responses to marginalised groups at high risk of homelessness, including people with substance misuse problems, ex-offenders, young people excluded from the family home, migrants, and women fleeing domestic violence. The evidence suggests that a range of values embedded in national political cultures – including familialism, social cohesion, individuality, personal responsibility, and personal liberty, as well as egalitarianism - impact on models of intervention and outcomes for specific marginalised groups in ways which cannot be straightforwardly predicted from conventional welfare regime analysis.

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