Vessel traffic in the Canadian Arctic: Management solutions for minimizing impacts on whales in a changing northern region

Lauren H. McWhinnie, William D. Halliday, Stephen J. Insley, Casey Hilliard, Rosaline R. Canessa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Warming weather conditions in the Arctic are already resulting in changes in both sea ice extent and thickness. The resulting extended ‘open water’ season has many implications for vessel traffic and marine life. For example, an increase in vessel traffic due to ice-free waters will most likely lead to an increased risk of impact on cetaceans through increased noise pollution, strike risk for some cetacean species, and the possibility of exposure to chemical pollutants. The objective of this study was to pre-empt a predicted increase in vessels by investigating and exploring possible management scenarios, with the aim of mitigating negative impacts on locally important species such as bowhead and beluga whales. Utilizing insights gained from established vessel management schemes in more southerly regions, this paper evaluates the current suite of tools being implemented and their appropriateness for implementation in a more extreme Arctic environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalOcean and Coastal Management
Volume160
Early online date7 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Vessel traffic in the Canadian Arctic: Management solutions for minimizing impacts on whales in a changing northern region'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this