Velocity profiles above and within the wave bottom boundary layer over a sloping bottom

Qingping Zou, Alex E. Hay

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Theoretical solutions for the wave bottom boundary layer (WBL) are obtained using a viscoelastic turbulent closure model including sloping bed effects. The overlying free stream velocity is given by nonlinear Stokes wave theory for a sloping bottom. The viscoelastic closure scheme extends conventional eddy viscosity models by incorporating the effects of eddy relaxation and diffusion on vertical momentum exchange in the WBL, and gives improved predictions of observed velocity profiles. Field measurements of nearbed velocity profiles are then compared with theoretical solutions for a 2 bed slope. Field measurements were obtained in the lower 50 cm of the water column in 3.7 m depth with a coherent Doppler profiler. Results are presented from a storm event for flat bed. Within the region 8 cm above the bed, the observed velocity profiles change rapidly in amplitude and phase relative to potential flow theory, indicating the presence of the wave boundary layer. Furthermore, the observed vertical velocity profile in this region deviates significantly from the WBL theory for a horizontal flat bottom, but compares well with the sloping bottom theory presented here.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCoastal Engineering 2000 - Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Coastal Engineering, ICCE 2000
Pages94-107
Number of pages14
Volume276
Publication statusPublished - 2000
EventCoastal Engineering 2000 - 27th International Conference on Coastal Engineering - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 16 Jul 200021 Jul 2000

Conference

ConferenceCoastal Engineering 2000 - 27th International Conference on Coastal Engineering
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period16/07/0021/07/00

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ocean Engineering

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