Validation of human whole blood oximetry, using a hyperspectral fundus camera with a model eye

David J. Mordant, Ied Al-Abboud, Gonzalo Muyo, Alistair Gorman, Ahmed Sallam, Paul Rodmell, John Crowe, Steve Morgan, Peter Ritchie, Andrew R. Harvey, Andrew I. McNaught

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE. To assess the accuracy of human blood oximetry measurements in a model eye with a hyperspectral fundus camera. METHODS. Seven human whole blood samples (two arterial, five venous) were obtained, the oxygen saturations measured with a CO oximeter, and the samples inserted into quartz tubes with internal diameters of 100 and 150 µm. The tubes (n = 20; ten 100 µm and ten 150 µm) were placed within a model eye in front of a background reflectance surface with reflectivities of 20%, 60%, and 99%. Spectral images at wavelengths between 500 and 650 nm were acquired with a hyperspectral fundus camera and analyzed with an oximetric model to calculate the oxygen saturation of blood within the tubes. The calculated oxygen saturations were compared with the measured oxygen saturations. The effects of the background reflectivity and tube size on the accuracy of the calculated oxygen saturations were evaluated. RESULTS. Background reflectivity and tube size had no significant effect on the mean oxygen saturation difference (P = 0.18 and P = 0.99, respectively; repeated-measures, two-way ANOVA). The mean differences (SD) between the measured and calculated oxygen saturations in segments of the 100 and 150 µm tubes overlying the 20%, 60%, and 99% background reflectivities were (100 µm) -4.0% (13.4%), -6.4% (9.9%), and -5.5% (10.2%) and (150 µm) -5.3% (10.8%), -5.2% (10.7%), and -5.2% (10.9%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS. There was reasonable agreement between the measured oxygen saturation values and those calculated by the oximetry model. The oximetry model could be used to determine the functional health of the retina. © 2011 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2851-2859
Number of pages9
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

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Oximetry
Oxygen
Quartz
Carbon Monoxide
Retina
Analysis of Variance
Health

Cite this

Mordant, D. J., Al-Abboud, I., Muyo, G., Gorman, A., Sallam, A., Rodmell, P., ... McNaught, A. I. (2011). Validation of human whole blood oximetry, using a hyperspectral fundus camera with a model eye. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 52(5), 2851-2859. https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.10-6217
Mordant, David J. ; Al-Abboud, Ied ; Muyo, Gonzalo ; Gorman, Alistair ; Sallam, Ahmed ; Rodmell, Paul ; Crowe, John ; Morgan, Steve ; Ritchie, Peter ; Harvey, Andrew R. ; McNaught, Andrew I. / Validation of human whole blood oximetry, using a hyperspectral fundus camera with a model eye. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2011 ; Vol. 52, No. 5. pp. 2851-2859.
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Mordant, DJ, Al-Abboud, I, Muyo, G, Gorman, A, Sallam, A, Rodmell, P, Crowe, J, Morgan, S, Ritchie, P, Harvey, AR & McNaught, AI 2011, 'Validation of human whole blood oximetry, using a hyperspectral fundus camera with a model eye', Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 52, no. 5, pp. 2851-2859. https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.10-6217

Validation of human whole blood oximetry, using a hyperspectral fundus camera with a model eye. / Mordant, David J.; Al-Abboud, Ied; Muyo, Gonzalo; Gorman, Alistair; Sallam, Ahmed; Rodmell, Paul; Crowe, John; Morgan, Steve; Ritchie, Peter; Harvey, Andrew R.; McNaught, Andrew I.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 52, No. 5, 04.2011, p. 2851-2859.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validation of human whole blood oximetry, using a hyperspectral fundus camera with a model eye

AU - Mordant, David J.

AU - Al-Abboud, Ied

AU - Muyo, Gonzalo

AU - Gorman, Alistair

AU - Sallam, Ahmed

AU - Rodmell, Paul

AU - Crowe, John

AU - Morgan, Steve

AU - Ritchie, Peter

AU - Harvey, Andrew R.

AU - McNaught, Andrew I.

PY - 2011/4

Y1 - 2011/4

N2 - PURPOSE. To assess the accuracy of human blood oximetry measurements in a model eye with a hyperspectral fundus camera. METHODS. Seven human whole blood samples (two arterial, five venous) were obtained, the oxygen saturations measured with a CO oximeter, and the samples inserted into quartz tubes with internal diameters of 100 and 150 µm. The tubes (n = 20; ten 100 µm and ten 150 µm) were placed within a model eye in front of a background reflectance surface with reflectivities of 20%, 60%, and 99%. Spectral images at wavelengths between 500 and 650 nm were acquired with a hyperspectral fundus camera and analyzed with an oximetric model to calculate the oxygen saturation of blood within the tubes. The calculated oxygen saturations were compared with the measured oxygen saturations. The effects of the background reflectivity and tube size on the accuracy of the calculated oxygen saturations were evaluated. RESULTS. Background reflectivity and tube size had no significant effect on the mean oxygen saturation difference (P = 0.18 and P = 0.99, respectively; repeated-measures, two-way ANOVA). The mean differences (SD) between the measured and calculated oxygen saturations in segments of the 100 and 150 µm tubes overlying the 20%, 60%, and 99% background reflectivities were (100 µm) -4.0% (13.4%), -6.4% (9.9%), and -5.5% (10.2%) and (150 µm) -5.3% (10.8%), -5.2% (10.7%), and -5.2% (10.9%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS. There was reasonable agreement between the measured oxygen saturation values and those calculated by the oximetry model. The oximetry model could be used to determine the functional health of the retina. © 2011 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

AB - PURPOSE. To assess the accuracy of human blood oximetry measurements in a model eye with a hyperspectral fundus camera. METHODS. Seven human whole blood samples (two arterial, five venous) were obtained, the oxygen saturations measured with a CO oximeter, and the samples inserted into quartz tubes with internal diameters of 100 and 150 µm. The tubes (n = 20; ten 100 µm and ten 150 µm) were placed within a model eye in front of a background reflectance surface with reflectivities of 20%, 60%, and 99%. Spectral images at wavelengths between 500 and 650 nm were acquired with a hyperspectral fundus camera and analyzed with an oximetric model to calculate the oxygen saturation of blood within the tubes. The calculated oxygen saturations were compared with the measured oxygen saturations. The effects of the background reflectivity and tube size on the accuracy of the calculated oxygen saturations were evaluated. RESULTS. Background reflectivity and tube size had no significant effect on the mean oxygen saturation difference (P = 0.18 and P = 0.99, respectively; repeated-measures, two-way ANOVA). The mean differences (SD) between the measured and calculated oxygen saturations in segments of the 100 and 150 µm tubes overlying the 20%, 60%, and 99% background reflectivities were (100 µm) -4.0% (13.4%), -6.4% (9.9%), and -5.5% (10.2%) and (150 µm) -5.3% (10.8%), -5.2% (10.7%), and -5.2% (10.9%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS. There was reasonable agreement between the measured oxygen saturation values and those calculated by the oximetry model. The oximetry model could be used to determine the functional health of the retina. © 2011 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

U2 - 10.1167/iovs.10-6217

DO - 10.1167/iovs.10-6217

M3 - Article

C2 - 21220553

VL - 52

SP - 2851

EP - 2859

JO - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

JF - Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science

SN - 0146-0404

IS - 5

ER -