Using the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) to explore conflicts between different road user groups when making right hand turns at urban intersections

Paul M. Salmon, Michael G. Lenné, Guy H Walker, Neville A. Stanton, Ashleigh Filtness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)
116 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Collisions between different types of road users at intersections form a substantial component of the road toll. This paper presents an analysis of driver, cyclist, motorcyclist and pedestrian behaviour at intersections that involved the application of an integrated suite of ergonomics methods, the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) framework, to on-road study data. EAST was used to analyse behaviour at three intersections using data derived from an on-road study of driver, cyclist, motorcyclist and pedestrian behaviour. The analysis shows the differences in behaviour and cognition across the different road user groups and pinpoints instances where this may be creating conflicts between different road users. The role of intersection design in creating these differences in behaviour and resulting conflicts is discussed. It is concluded that currently intersections are not designed in a way that supports behaviour across the four forms of road user studied. Interventions designed to improve intersection safety are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1628-1642
Number of pages15
JournalErgonomics
Volume57
Issue number11
Early online date10 Sep 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2014

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