Using the abstraction hierarchy to identify how the purpose and structure of road transport systems contributes to road trauma

Paul M. Salmon, Gemma J. M. Read, Nicholas Stevens, Guy H. Walker, Vanessa Beanland, Rod McClure, Brett Hughes, Ian R. Johnston, Neville A. Stanton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
15 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Research is beginning to demonstrate the merits of considering the broader road transport system when attempting to understand and prevent road trauma. This study involved the use of Work Domain Analysis, a systems analysis method, to develop a model of a road transport system based on Queensland, Australia. The model was subsequently used to identify the system wide contributory factors that play a role in road crashes, and to identify aspects of road transport systems that could be exploited when developing road safety interventions. The findings show that there are a set of crash contributory factors relating to the raison d'etre, values, and functions of road transport systems. This suggests that further significant reductions in road trauma will only be achieved through fundamental changes to the road transport system itself. Examples discussed include reducing the emphasis on the use of road transport for economic growth, reducing motor vehicle use and increasing active transport modes, and overhauling road safety strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100067
JournalTransportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Volume3
Early online date26 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Abstraction hierarchy
  • Road safety
  • Road transport
  • Systems thinking
  • Work domain analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Automotive Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Management Science and Operations Research

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