Trophic Structure and Community Stability in an Overfished Ecosystem

Anne Cristine Utne-Palm, Anne G. V. Salvanes, Bronwen Currie, Stein Kaartvedt, Göran E. Nilsson, Victoria A. Braithwaite, Jonathan A. W. Stecyk, Matthias Hundt, Megan van der Bank, Bradley Flynn, Guro K. Sandvik, Thor A. Klevjer, Andrew K. Sweetman, Volker Brüchert, Karin Pittman, Kathleen R. Peard, Ida G. Lunde, Rønnaug A. U. Strandabø, Mark J. Gibbons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since the collapse of the pelagic fisheries off southwest Africa in the late 1960s, jellyfish biomass has increased and the structure of the Benguelan fish community has shifted, making the bearded goby (Sufflogobius bibarbatus) the new predominant prey species. Despite increased predation pressure and a harsh environment, the gobies are thriving. Here we show that physiological adaptations and antipredator and foraging behaviors underpin the success of these fish. In particular, body-tissue isotope signatures reveal that gobies consume jellyfish and sulphidic diatomaceous mud, transferring “dead-end” resources back into the food chain.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)333-336
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume329
Issue number5989
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jul 2010

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Ecosystem
Fishes
Namibia
Physiological Adaptation
Fisheries
Food Chain
Isotopes
Biomass
Pressure

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Utne-Palm, A. C., Salvanes, A. G. V., Currie, B., Kaartvedt, S., Nilsson, G. E., Braithwaite, V. A., ... Gibbons, M. J. (2010). Trophic Structure and Community Stability in an Overfished Ecosystem. Science, 329(5989), 333-336. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1190708
Utne-Palm, Anne Cristine ; Salvanes, Anne G. V. ; Currie, Bronwen ; Kaartvedt, Stein ; Nilsson, Göran E. ; Braithwaite, Victoria A. ; Stecyk, Jonathan A. W. ; Hundt, Matthias ; van der Bank, Megan ; Flynn, Bradley ; Sandvik, Guro K. ; Klevjer, Thor A. ; Sweetman, Andrew K. ; Brüchert, Volker ; Pittman, Karin ; Peard, Kathleen R. ; Lunde, Ida G. ; Strandabø, Rønnaug A. U. ; Gibbons, Mark J. / Trophic Structure and Community Stability in an Overfished Ecosystem. In: Science. 2010 ; Vol. 329, No. 5989. pp. 333-336.
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Utne-Palm, AC, Salvanes, AGV, Currie, B, Kaartvedt, S, Nilsson, GE, Braithwaite, VA, Stecyk, JAW, Hundt, M, van der Bank, M, Flynn, B, Sandvik, GK, Klevjer, TA, Sweetman, AK, Brüchert, V, Pittman, K, Peard, KR, Lunde, IG, Strandabø, RAU & Gibbons, MJ 2010, 'Trophic Structure and Community Stability in an Overfished Ecosystem', Science, vol. 329, no. 5989, pp. 333-336. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1190708

Trophic Structure and Community Stability in an Overfished Ecosystem. / Utne-Palm, Anne Cristine; Salvanes, Anne G. V.; Currie, Bronwen; Kaartvedt, Stein; Nilsson, Göran E.; Braithwaite, Victoria A.; Stecyk, Jonathan A. W.; Hundt, Matthias; van der Bank, Megan; Flynn, Bradley; Sandvik, Guro K.; Klevjer, Thor A.; Sweetman, Andrew K.; Brüchert, Volker; Pittman, Karin; Peard, Kathleen R.; Lunde, Ida G.; Strandabø, Rønnaug A. U.; Gibbons, Mark J.

In: Science, Vol. 329, No. 5989, 16.07.2010, p. 333-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trophic Structure and Community Stability in an Overfished Ecosystem

AU - Utne-Palm, Anne Cristine

AU - Salvanes, Anne G. V.

AU - Currie, Bronwen

AU - Kaartvedt, Stein

AU - Nilsson, Göran E.

AU - Braithwaite, Victoria A.

AU - Stecyk, Jonathan A. W.

AU - Hundt, Matthias

AU - van der Bank, Megan

AU - Flynn, Bradley

AU - Sandvik, Guro K.

AU - Klevjer, Thor A.

AU - Sweetman, Andrew K.

AU - Brüchert, Volker

AU - Pittman, Karin

AU - Peard, Kathleen R.

AU - Lunde, Ida G.

AU - Strandabø, Rønnaug A. U.

AU - Gibbons, Mark J.

PY - 2010/7/16

Y1 - 2010/7/16

N2 - Since the collapse of the pelagic fisheries off southwest Africa in the late 1960s, jellyfish biomass has increased and the structure of the Benguelan fish community has shifted, making the bearded goby (Sufflogobius bibarbatus) the new predominant prey species. Despite increased predation pressure and a harsh environment, the gobies are thriving. Here we show that physiological adaptations and antipredator and foraging behaviors underpin the success of these fish. In particular, body-tissue isotope signatures reveal that gobies consume jellyfish and sulphidic diatomaceous mud, transferring “dead-end” resources back into the food chain.

AB - Since the collapse of the pelagic fisheries off southwest Africa in the late 1960s, jellyfish biomass has increased and the structure of the Benguelan fish community has shifted, making the bearded goby (Sufflogobius bibarbatus) the new predominant prey species. Despite increased predation pressure and a harsh environment, the gobies are thriving. Here we show that physiological adaptations and antipredator and foraging behaviors underpin the success of these fish. In particular, body-tissue isotope signatures reveal that gobies consume jellyfish and sulphidic diatomaceous mud, transferring “dead-end” resources back into the food chain.

U2 - 10.1126/science.1190708

DO - 10.1126/science.1190708

M3 - Article

VL - 329

SP - 333

EP - 336

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 5989

ER -

Utne-Palm AC, Salvanes AGV, Currie B, Kaartvedt S, Nilsson GE, Braithwaite VA et al. Trophic Structure and Community Stability in an Overfished Ecosystem. Science. 2010 Jul 16;329(5989):333-336. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1190708