Transverse isotropic elastic properties of vertebral trabecular bone matrix measured using microindentation under dry conditions (effects of age, gender, and vertebral level)

Uwe Wolfram, Hans-Joachim Wilke, Philippe K. Zysset

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mechanical properties of bone extracellular matrix have become of increasing interest for the understanding of vertebral fracture risk. Depth-sensing indentation techniques allow the measurement of directional elastic properties of trabecular bone ex vivo with a high spatial resolution. Transverse isotropic elastic properties of vertebral trabecular bone obtained from two orthogonal directions were investigated using microindentation under dry conditions focusing on the influence of microanatomical location, age, gender, vertebral level, and anatomic direction on these properties. Biopsies were obtained from 104 human vertebrae (T1L3) with a median age of 65 (2194) years. Significantly, higher indentation moduli were found for indentations on axial than on transverse cross-sections of trabeculae (p <0.01). Indentation moduli in the core were 1.05 to 1.12 times higher than in the periphery (p <0.01). No difference in stiffness could be detected between males and females (p > 0.05) and different ages (p > 0.5). Vertebral level showed a weak correlation (p = 0.073, r2 ≈ 0.17). These results provide insights in the transverse isotropic properties of trabecular bone matrix related to age, gender, microanatomical location, and anatomic direction for a broad spectrum of human vertebrae.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-150
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Keywords

  • Nanoindentation
  • Trabecular bone
  • Transverse isotropy
  • Vertebral body

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

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