The voices that matter: A narrative approach to understanding Scottish Fishers' perspectives of Brexit

Giulia Agnisola, Stephanie Weir, Kate Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a dive into the views of Scottish fishers towards the Brexit process. The failure of fisheries management by the EU and its Common Fisheries Policy was a key argument used by the Leave Campaign. This was seemingly supported by the Scottish fishing industry, as declared by the powerful voices in national representative bodies. Using semi-structured interviews with 12 individuals representing the industry, the study sets out to give voice to less powerful narratives and to understand the nuances of their reasons for voting to leave. The research suggests a truer story of the fishing industry's perspective of Brexit is constituent of three parts. First, that despite the unified view portrayed in media and by industry representatives, there are clear disparities in their voices and their reasoning. These are particularly evident between sector and non-sector fishers. Second, there are parallels within the narratives that demonstrated a feeling of betrayal and othering symptomatic of the ‘left behind’. Third, both the disparities and parallels are fed by shared misconceptions of a past that has been reimagined to justify past and future decisions. This research indicates that attitudes to complex social events are often fed by mythologies and forced narratives espoused by powerful voices, whilst weaker voices are ignored. This does not preclude the value of fishers' experiences and attitudes and, instead, demonstrates the importance of listening to all voices for effective policy making to ensure future proposals do not only reflect the needs of the most vocal.
Original languageEnglish
Article number103563
JournalMarine Policy
Early online date13 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

fishing industry
fish industry
Common Fisheries Policy
industry
narrative
fishery management
policy making
fisheries management
fishery
interviews
fisheries
mythology
voting
campaign
EU
event
interview
management
Values
experience

Keywords

  • Attitudes research
  • Brexit
  • Fisheries management
  • Narratives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Law

Cite this

@article{a7e55e1d939c41f599c7f62536669fb7,
title = "The voices that matter: A narrative approach to understanding Scottish Fishers' perspectives of Brexit",
abstract = "This paper presents the results of a dive into the views of Scottish fishers towards the Brexit process. The failure of fisheries management by the EU and its Common Fisheries Policy was a key argument used by the Leave Campaign. This was seemingly supported by the Scottish fishing industry, as declared by the powerful voices in national representative bodies. Using semi-structured interviews with 12 individuals representing the industry, the study sets out to give voice to less powerful narratives and to understand the nuances of their reasons for voting to leave. The research suggests a truer story of the fishing industry's perspective of Brexit is constituent of three parts. First, that despite the unified view portrayed in media and by industry representatives, there are clear disparities in their voices and their reasoning. These are particularly evident between sector and non-sector fishers. Second, there are parallels within the narratives that demonstrated a feeling of betrayal and othering symptomatic of the ‘left behind’. Third, both the disparities and parallels are fed by shared misconceptions of a past that has been reimagined to justify past and future decisions. This research indicates that attitudes to complex social events are often fed by mythologies and forced narratives espoused by powerful voices, whilst weaker voices are ignored. This does not preclude the value of fishers' experiences and attitudes and, instead, demonstrates the importance of listening to all voices for effective policy making to ensure future proposals do not only reflect the needs of the most vocal.",
keywords = "Attitudes research, Brexit, Fisheries management, Narratives",
author = "Giulia Agnisola and Stephanie Weir and Kate Johnson",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1016/j.marpol.2019.103563",
language = "English",
journal = "Marine Policy",
issn = "0308-597X",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

The voices that matter: A narrative approach to understanding Scottish Fishers' perspectives of Brexit. / Agnisola, Giulia; Weir, Stephanie; Johnson, Kate.

In: Marine Policy, 13.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The voices that matter: A narrative approach to understanding Scottish Fishers' perspectives of Brexit

AU - Agnisola, Giulia

AU - Weir, Stephanie

AU - Johnson, Kate

PY - 2019/6/13

Y1 - 2019/6/13

N2 - This paper presents the results of a dive into the views of Scottish fishers towards the Brexit process. The failure of fisheries management by the EU and its Common Fisheries Policy was a key argument used by the Leave Campaign. This was seemingly supported by the Scottish fishing industry, as declared by the powerful voices in national representative bodies. Using semi-structured interviews with 12 individuals representing the industry, the study sets out to give voice to less powerful narratives and to understand the nuances of their reasons for voting to leave. The research suggests a truer story of the fishing industry's perspective of Brexit is constituent of three parts. First, that despite the unified view portrayed in media and by industry representatives, there are clear disparities in their voices and their reasoning. These are particularly evident between sector and non-sector fishers. Second, there are parallels within the narratives that demonstrated a feeling of betrayal and othering symptomatic of the ‘left behind’. Third, both the disparities and parallels are fed by shared misconceptions of a past that has been reimagined to justify past and future decisions. This research indicates that attitudes to complex social events are often fed by mythologies and forced narratives espoused by powerful voices, whilst weaker voices are ignored. This does not preclude the value of fishers' experiences and attitudes and, instead, demonstrates the importance of listening to all voices for effective policy making to ensure future proposals do not only reflect the needs of the most vocal.

AB - This paper presents the results of a dive into the views of Scottish fishers towards the Brexit process. The failure of fisheries management by the EU and its Common Fisheries Policy was a key argument used by the Leave Campaign. This was seemingly supported by the Scottish fishing industry, as declared by the powerful voices in national representative bodies. Using semi-structured interviews with 12 individuals representing the industry, the study sets out to give voice to less powerful narratives and to understand the nuances of their reasons for voting to leave. The research suggests a truer story of the fishing industry's perspective of Brexit is constituent of three parts. First, that despite the unified view portrayed in media and by industry representatives, there are clear disparities in their voices and their reasoning. These are particularly evident between sector and non-sector fishers. Second, there are parallels within the narratives that demonstrated a feeling of betrayal and othering symptomatic of the ‘left behind’. Third, both the disparities and parallels are fed by shared misconceptions of a past that has been reimagined to justify past and future decisions. This research indicates that attitudes to complex social events are often fed by mythologies and forced narratives espoused by powerful voices, whilst weaker voices are ignored. This does not preclude the value of fishers' experiences and attitudes and, instead, demonstrates the importance of listening to all voices for effective policy making to ensure future proposals do not only reflect the needs of the most vocal.

KW - Attitudes research

KW - Brexit

KW - Fisheries management

KW - Narratives

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067121011&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.marpol.2019.103563

DO - 10.1016/j.marpol.2019.103563

M3 - Article

JO - Marine Policy

JF - Marine Policy

SN - 0308-597X

M1 - 103563

ER -