The variation in composition of ultramafic rocks and the effect on their suitability for carbon dioxide sequestration by mineralization following acid leaching

M. T. Styles, A. Sanna, A. M. Lacinska, J. Naden, M. Maroto-Valer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)
42 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Carbon dioxide capture and storage by mineralization has been proposed as a possible technology to contribute to the reduction of global CO2 levels. A main candidate as a feed material, to supply Mg cations for combination with CO2 to form carbonate, is the family of ultramafic rocks, Mg-rich silicate rocks with a range of naturally occurring mineralogical compositions. A classification scheme is described and a diagram is proposed to display the full range of both fresh and altered ultramafic rock compositions. This is particularly for the benefit of technologists to raise the awareness of the variation in possible feedstock materials. A systematic set of acid leaching experiments, in the presence of recyclable ammonium bisulphate, has been carried out covering the range of ultramafic rock compositions. The results show that lizardite serpentinite releases the most Mg with 78% removed after 1 h, while an olivine rock (dunite) gave 55% and serpentinized peridotites intermediate values. Antigorite serpentinite only released 40% and pyroxene- and amphibole-rich rocks only 25%, showing they are unsuitable for the acid leaching method used. This wide variation in rock compositions highlights the necessity for accurate mineralogical characterization of potential resources and for technologists to be aware of the impact of feed material variations on process efficiency and development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)440-451
Number of pages12
JournalGreenhouse Gases: Science and Technology
Volume4
Issue number4
Early online date13 Feb 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

Keywords

  • acid leaching
  • carbon dioxide sequestration by mineralization
  • rock classification
  • serpentinite
  • ultramafic rocks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Engineering

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