The role of microbiota in tissue repair and regeneration

Amin Shavandi, Pouya Saeedi, Philippe Gérard, Esmat Jalalvandi, David Cannella, Alaa El-Din Bekhit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A comprehensive understanding of the human body endogenous microbiota is essential for acquiring an insight into the involvement of microbiota in tissue healing and regeneration process in order to enable development of biomaterials with a better integration with human body environment. Biomaterials used for biomedical applications are normally germ-free while the human body as the host of the biomaterials is not germ-free. The complexity and role of the body microbiota in tissue healing/regeneration have been underestimated historically. Traditionally, studies aiming at the development of novel biomaterials had focused on the effects of environment within the target tissue, neglecting the signals generated from the microbiota and their impact on tissue regeneration. The significance of the human body microbiota in relation to metabolism, immune system and consequently tissue regeneration has been recently realised and is a growing research field. This review summarises the recent findings on the role of microbiota and mechanisms involved in tissue healing and regeneration, in particular skin, liver, bone and nervous system re-growth and regeneration highlighting the possible potential of microbiota for development of a new generation of biomaterials.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
Early online date16 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Dec 2019

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    Shavandi, A., Saeedi, P., Gérard, P., Jalalvandi, E., Cannella, D., & Bekhit, A. E-D. (2019). The role of microbiota in tissue repair and regeneration. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1002/term.3009