The rise of big (crisis) data and ‘digital’humanitarians: observations and opportunities from an Applied Geohazard Scientist’s perspective

Emma J. Bee, Rosa Filgueira, Jacob Poole, Diego Diaz-Doce

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

Abstract

Applications developed using Web 2.0 technologies, such as social media sites, blogs, wikis etc., have had a profound impact on people's ability to interact and collaborate, and to generate and share content publically through virtual environments. During recent natural disasters there has been an impressive response effort, through web 2.0 technologies, from citizens (digital humanitarians). Tools have been developed overnight to help people find food, shelter or missing relatives or friends. There are examples of how social media, or a mechanism to connect people together, enables people to share feelings and better cope with their situation knowing that others are also experiencing the same problems.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018
EventEGU General Assembly 2018 - Vienna, Austria
Duration: 8 Apr 201813 Apr 2018

Conference

ConferenceEGU General Assembly 2018
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period8/04/1813/04/18

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