The Missing Side of Acculturation: How Majority-Group Members Relate to Immigrant and Minority-Group Cultures

Jonas R. Kunst*, Katharina Lefringhausen, David L. Sam, John W. Berry, John F. Dovidio

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (SciVal)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In many countries, individuals who have represented the majority group historically are decreasing in relative size and/or perceiving that they have diminished status and power compared with those self-identifying as immigrants or members of ethnic minority groups. These developments raise several salient and timely issues, including (a) how majority-group members’ cultural orientations change as a consequence of increasing intercultural contact due to shifting demographics; (b) what individual, group, cultural, and socio-structural processes shape these changes; and (c) what the implications of majority-group members’ acculturation are. Although research across several decades has examined the acculturation of individuals self-identifying as minority-group members, much less is known about how majority-group members acculturate in increasingly diverse societies. We present an overview of the state of the art in the emerging field of majority-group acculturation, identify what is known and needs to be known, and introduce a conceptual model to guide future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-494
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Directions in Psychological Science
Volume30
Issue number6
Early online date26 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2021

Keywords

  • acculturation
  • integration
  • intergroup contact
  • majority group
  • multiculturalism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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