The long-term evolution of news media in defining socio-ecological conflict: A case study of expanding aquaculture

Corrine M. Condie*, Joanna Vince, Karen A. Alexander

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community conflict is increasingly associated with commercial uses of the marine environment. This research investigates the evolution of newspaper coverage of finfish aquaculture over a 25-year period and how it has reflected growing levels of community conflict common to much of the world's salmon aquaculture production. A detailed case study suggests that by actively constraining debate to positive associations throughout the introduction and early growth stage of the industry lifecycle, companies and regulating agencies may have inadvertently: (i) eroded public trust by contributing to reader ambiguity and uncertainty relating to industry's environmental credentials and publicised partnerships with transnational environmental groups; (ii) failed to promote an open dialogue and a more informed community regarding the real benefits and risks of production; and (iii) created a situation in which negative influences on public opinion post-turning point were magnified.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104988
JournalMarine Policy
Volume138
Early online date15 Feb 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2022

Keywords

  • Aquaculture
  • Conflict
  • Farm
  • Fish
  • Media
  • Turning-point

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • General Environmental Science
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Law

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