The intersection of disability and in-work poverty in an advanced industrial nation: The lived experience of multiple disadvantage in a post-financial crisis UK

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The 2007–2008 financial crisis has affected the prospects for workers in a range of ways. In-work poverty represents just one, yet key feature of how prospects for workers have changed in recent times. In-work poverty disproportionately impacts on marginalised groups, such as the disabled. Current research reveals little about how disability and poverty intersect in the context of employment. To address this oversight, life history interviews were conducted with disabled people in in-work poverty. The findings were analysed using the social model of disability and the lens of intersectionality. The results highlight how government policies, employer practices and household finances impact on disabled workers’ lived experience of in-work poverty. The findings suggest that governments and employers can do more to reduce barriers to escaping in-work poverty for disabled workers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)636-659
Number of pages24
JournalEconomic and Industrial Democracy
Volume40
Issue number3
Early online date20 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

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Finance
Lenses
Disadvantage
Financial crisis
Poverty
Workers

Keywords

  • Disability
  • financial crisis
  • in-work poverty
  • intersectionality
  • social model of disability
  • United Kingdom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

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