The impact of short- and long-range perception on population movements

Stuart T. Johnston, Kevin J. Painter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Navigation of cells and organisms is typically achieved by detecting and processing orienteering cues. Occasionally, a cue may be assessed over a much larger range than the individual’s body size, as in visual scanning for landmarks. In this paper we formulate models that account for orientation in response to short- or long-range cue evaluation. Starting from an underlying random walk movement model, where a generic cue is evaluated locally or nonlocally to determine a preferred direction, we state corresponding macroscopic partial differential equations to describe population movements. Under certain approximations, these models reduce to well-known local and nonlocal biological transport equations, including those of Keller–Segel type. We consider a case-study application: “hilltopping” in Lepidoptera and other insects, a phenomenon in which populations accumulate at summits to improve encounter/mating rates. Nonlocal responses are shown to efficiently filter out the natural noisiness (or roughness) of typical landscapes and allow the population to preferentially accumulate at a subset of hilltopping locations, in line with field studies. Moreover, according to the timescale of movement, optimal responses may occur for different perceptual ranges.
LanguageEnglish
Pages227-242
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume460
Early online date16 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Cues
Population
Biological Transport
Lepidoptera
Body Size
Insects

Cite this

@article{9ba892ab44f14ed180683ac4d0990f53,
title = "The impact of short- and long-range perception on population movements",
abstract = "Navigation of cells and organisms is typically achieved by detecting and processing orienteering cues. Occasionally, a cue may be assessed over a much larger range than the individual’s body size, as in visual scanning for landmarks. In this paper we formulate models that account for orientation in response to short- or long-range cue evaluation. Starting from an underlying random walk movement model, where a generic cue is evaluated locally or nonlocally to determine a preferred direction, we state corresponding macroscopic partial differential equations to describe population movements. Under certain approximations, these models reduce to well-known local and nonlocal biological transport equations, including those of Keller–Segel type. We consider a case-study application: “hilltopping” in Lepidoptera and other insects, a phenomenon in which populations accumulate at summits to improve encounter/mating rates. Nonlocal responses are shown to efficiently filter out the natural noisiness (or roughness) of typical landscapes and allow the population to preferentially accumulate at a subset of hilltopping locations, in line with field studies. Moreover, according to the timescale of movement, optimal responses may occur for different perceptual ranges.",
author = "Johnston, {Stuart T.} and Painter, {Kevin J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.jtbi.2018.10.031",
language = "English",
volume = "460",
pages = "227--242",
journal = "Journal of Theoretical Biology",
issn = "0022-5193",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

The impact of short- and long-range perception on population movements. / Johnston, Stuart T.; Painter, Kevin J.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 460, 07.01.2019, p. 227-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of short- and long-range perception on population movements

AU - Johnston, Stuart T.

AU - Painter, Kevin J.

PY - 2019/1/7

Y1 - 2019/1/7

N2 - Navigation of cells and organisms is typically achieved by detecting and processing orienteering cues. Occasionally, a cue may be assessed over a much larger range than the individual’s body size, as in visual scanning for landmarks. In this paper we formulate models that account for orientation in response to short- or long-range cue evaluation. Starting from an underlying random walk movement model, where a generic cue is evaluated locally or nonlocally to determine a preferred direction, we state corresponding macroscopic partial differential equations to describe population movements. Under certain approximations, these models reduce to well-known local and nonlocal biological transport equations, including those of Keller–Segel type. We consider a case-study application: “hilltopping” in Lepidoptera and other insects, a phenomenon in which populations accumulate at summits to improve encounter/mating rates. Nonlocal responses are shown to efficiently filter out the natural noisiness (or roughness) of typical landscapes and allow the population to preferentially accumulate at a subset of hilltopping locations, in line with field studies. Moreover, according to the timescale of movement, optimal responses may occur for different perceptual ranges.

AB - Navigation of cells and organisms is typically achieved by detecting and processing orienteering cues. Occasionally, a cue may be assessed over a much larger range than the individual’s body size, as in visual scanning for landmarks. In this paper we formulate models that account for orientation in response to short- or long-range cue evaluation. Starting from an underlying random walk movement model, where a generic cue is evaluated locally or nonlocally to determine a preferred direction, we state corresponding macroscopic partial differential equations to describe population movements. Under certain approximations, these models reduce to well-known local and nonlocal biological transport equations, including those of Keller–Segel type. We consider a case-study application: “hilltopping” in Lepidoptera and other insects, a phenomenon in which populations accumulate at summits to improve encounter/mating rates. Nonlocal responses are shown to efficiently filter out the natural noisiness (or roughness) of typical landscapes and allow the population to preferentially accumulate at a subset of hilltopping locations, in line with field studies. Moreover, according to the timescale of movement, optimal responses may occur for different perceptual ranges.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jtbi.2018.10.031

DO - 10.1016/j.jtbi.2018.10.031

M3 - Article

VL - 460

SP - 227

EP - 242

JO - Journal of Theoretical Biology

T2 - Journal of Theoretical Biology

JF - Journal of Theoretical Biology

SN - 0022-5193

ER -