The employment and skill implications of the adoption of new technology: a comparison of small engineering firms in core and peripheral regions

P. N. O'Farrell, R. P. Oakey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This paper examines the direct post-adoption effects of the introduction of new technology, specifically computer numerically controlled (CNC) machine tools, by small independent metalworking firms in three regions of the UK, the southeast of England, Scotland and Wales. The research reports upon the impact of CNC adoption upon employment levels; the skills of operatives; the effect of CNCs upon skills and pay rates; the organisation of work and job content; and training. A benign interpretation of new technology's effects upon employment and deskilling is substantiated. The impact of CNC adoption upon enskilling has been similar in both the core and periphery of Britain. Also, there is scant evidence that CNC adoption has led to an increasingly polarised workforce. -Authors

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)507-526
    Number of pages20
    JournalUrban Studies
    Volume30
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 1993

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