The effects of increased magnesium and calcium concentrations on yeast fermentation performance in high gravity worts

E. M R Rees, Graham G. Stewart

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The response of a number of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ale) and Saccharomyces uvarum (carlsbergensis) (lager) strains to altered starting levels of magnesium and calcium in 12°P (1048 original gravity) or 20°P (1080 original gravity) wort were investigated. In general, the same trends were observed in all 6 strains, however the extent of the response to adjusted levels of magnesium and calcium were found to be strain dependent. The results indicate that an increased ratio of magnesium to calcium causes an increase in the initial fermentation rate, the rate and yield of ethanol produced and an increase in vitality at the end of fermentation, in all strains employed. Upon increasing the calcium to magnesium ratio it was found that the initial fermentation rate was decreased, resulting in an increased attenuation time in the case of the lager strains. It was also noted that increasing the calcium to magnesium ratio led to a decreased ethanol production, maltotriose uptake, and in the case of the lager strains, maltose uptake was also adversely affected under these conditions. Altering the calcium and magnesium levels had no effect on the viability of the yeast or on glycogen levels.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)287-291
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of the Institute of Brewing
    Volume103
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 1997

    Fingerprint

    gravity
    magnesium
    fermentation
    yeasts
    calcium
    maltotriose
    ethanol production
    maltose
    glycogen
    Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    ethanol
    viability

    Keywords

    • Calcium
    • Fermentation
    • High gravity brewing
    • Magnesium
    • Yeast

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The response of a number of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ale) and Saccharomyces uvarum (carlsbergensis) (lager) strains to altered starting levels of magnesium and calcium in 12°P (1048 original gravity) or 20°P (1080 original gravity) wort were investigated. In general, the same trends were observed in all 6 strains, however the extent of the response to adjusted levels of magnesium and calcium were found to be strain dependent. The results indicate that an increased ratio of magnesium to calcium causes an increase in the initial fermentation rate, the rate and yield of ethanol produced and an increase in vitality at the end of fermentation, in all strains employed. Upon increasing the calcium to magnesium ratio it was found that the initial fermentation rate was decreased, resulting in an increased attenuation time in the case of the lager strains. It was also noted that increasing the calcium to magnesium ratio led to a decreased ethanol production, maltotriose uptake, and in the case of the lager strains, maltose uptake was also adversely affected under these conditions. Altering the calcium and magnesium levels had no effect on the viability of the yeast or on glycogen levels.",
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    The effects of increased magnesium and calcium concentrations on yeast fermentation performance in high gravity worts. / Rees, E. M R; Stewart, Graham G.

    In: Journal of the Institute of Brewing, Vol. 103, No. 5, 09.1997, p. 287-291.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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