The effect of prey shape on the predatory behaviour of the common shore crab, Carcinus maenas (L.)

M. J. Kaiser, Roger N. Hughes, Robin N. Gibson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Crabs used a limited repertoire of behaviours when attacking resistant prey. Crushing and rotating were the most commonly used behaviours with all prey types. Other behaviours, such as sawing, biting and poking became more important in prolonged predatory acts. Crabs were able to improve their handling efficiency; the frequency, but not the duration, of behaviours decreased with experience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-117
Number of pages11
JournalMarine Behaviour and Physiology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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