The Development of Selective Copying: Children’s Learning from an Expert versus their Mother

Amanda J. Lucas, Emily R. R. Burdett, Vanessa Burgess, Lara A. Wood, Nicola McGuigan, Paul L. Harris, Andrew Whiten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study tested the prediction that, with age, children should rely less on familiarity and more on expertise in their selective social learning. Experiment 1 (N=50) found that 5- to 6-year-olds copied the technique their mother used to extract a prize from a novel puzzle box, in preference to both a stranger and an established expert. This bias occurred despite children acknowledging the expert model’s superior capability. Experiment 2 (N=50) demonstrated a shift in 7-to 8-year-olds towards copying the expert. Children aged 9- to 10-years did not copy according to a model bias. The findings of a follow-up study (N=30) confirmed that, instead, they prioritized their own – partially flawed – causal understanding of the puzzle box.
Original languageEnglish
JournalChild Development
Early online date29 Dec 2016
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 29 Dec 2016

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Learning
learning
experiment
Recognition (Psychology)
familiarity
prediction

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Lucas, A. J., Burdett, E. R. R., Burgess, V., Wood, L. A., McGuigan, N., Harris, P. L., & Whiten, A. (2016). The Development of Selective Copying: Children’s Learning from an Expert versus their Mother. Child Development. DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12711

Lucas, Amanda J.; Burdett, Emily R. R.; Burgess, Vanessa; Wood, Lara A.; McGuigan, Nicola; Harris, Paul L.; Whiten, Andrew / The Development of Selective Copying: Children’s Learning from an Expert versus their Mother.

In: Child Development, 29.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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The Development of Selective Copying: Children’s Learning from an Expert versus their Mother. / Lucas, Amanda J.; Burdett, Emily R. R.; Burgess, Vanessa; Wood, Lara A.; McGuigan, Nicola; Harris, Paul L.; Whiten, Andrew.

In: Child Development, 29.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Burgess,Vanessa

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AU - McGuigan,Nicola

AU - Harris,Paul L.

AU - Whiten,Andrew

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Lucas AJ, Burdett ERR, Burgess V, Wood LA, McGuigan N, Harris PL et al. The Development of Selective Copying: Children’s Learning from an Expert versus their Mother. Child Development. 2016 Dec 29. Available from, DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12711