The delignification and bleaching of non-wood fibres with peroxymonosulphate. Part 4. Jute

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The effect of peroxymonosulphate (Oxone) as an activating agent for the delignification of jute has been studied. Activation conditions were varied in the following ranges: Oxone0-200 gL-1 and temperature 30-100°. Delignification was followed by extraction with 1 M NaOH. The residues were analysed for lignin and residual neutral sugar composition both before and after alkali extraction. Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectra of the residues after alkali extraction were analysed. Treatment of jute with acid alone showed that the constituent NCPs were relatively resistant to acidolysis even at 100°, although there was evidence of acidolysis of lignin-carbohydrate linkages in the corresponding DRIFT spectra. Treatment with acidic Oxonereduced residual levels of both lignin and non-cellulosic polysaccharides. Subsequent extraction of the residues with 1 M NaOH produced greater reductions. Delignification exhibited a direct relationship with both temperature and Oxone concentration, resulting in a maximum level of lignin removal of 97%. There was evidence that some of the constituent pectic polysaccharides and glucomannan were linked to lignin, Oxoneproved to be an effective bleaching agent and produced increased levels of brightness with increasing temperature and Oxoneconcentration. In some cases, equivalent levels of brightness were achieved by concurrently increasing the temperature and decreasing the Oxoneconcentration.
    ©Academiei Române
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)287-298
    Number of pages12
    JournalCellulose Chemistry and Technology
    Volume34
    Issue number3-4
    Publication statusPublished - 2000

    Fingerprint

    delignification
    jute
    bleaching
    lignin
    acidolysis
    alkalis
    temperature
    polysaccharides
    bleaching agents
    reflectance
    carbohydrates
    sugars
    acids

    Keywords

    • natural fiber
    • jute
    • chemical modification
    • delignification
    • bleaching
    • peroxomonosulfates
    • optimization
    • operating conditions
    • Experimental study

    Cite this

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    title = "The delignification and bleaching of non-wood fibres with peroxymonosulphate. Part 4. Jute",
    abstract = "The effect of peroxymonosulphate (Oxone) as an activating agent for the delignification of jute has been studied. Activation conditions were varied in the following ranges: Oxone0-200 gL-1 and temperature 30-100°. Delignification was followed by extraction with 1 M NaOH. The residues were analysed for lignin and residual neutral sugar composition both before and after alkali extraction. Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectra of the residues after alkali extraction were analysed. Treatment of jute with acid alone showed that the constituent NCPs were relatively resistant to acidolysis even at 100°, although there was evidence of acidolysis of lignin-carbohydrate linkages in the corresponding DRIFT spectra. Treatment with acidic Oxonereduced residual levels of both lignin and non-cellulosic polysaccharides. Subsequent extraction of the residues with 1 M NaOH produced greater reductions. Delignification exhibited a direct relationship with both temperature and Oxone concentration, resulting in a maximum level of lignin removal of 97{\%}. There was evidence that some of the constituent pectic polysaccharides and glucomannan were linked to lignin, Oxoneproved to be an effective bleaching agent and produced increased levels of brightness with increasing temperature and Oxoneconcentration. In some cases, equivalent levels of brightness were achieved by concurrently increasing the temperature and decreasing the Oxoneconcentration.{\circledC}Academiei Rom{\^a}ne",
    keywords = "natural fiber, jute, chemical modification, delignification, bleaching, peroxomonosulfates, optimization, operating conditions, Experimental study",
    author = "Derek Stewart",
    note = "No DOI available",
    year = "2000",
    language = "English",
    volume = "34",
    pages = "287--298",
    journal = "Cellulose Chemistry and Technology",
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    publisher = "Editura Academiei Romane",
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    }

    The delignification and bleaching of non-wood fibres with peroxymonosulphate. Part 4. Jute. / Stewart, Derek.

    In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, Vol. 34, No. 3-4, 2000, p. 287-298.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The delignification and bleaching of non-wood fibres with peroxymonosulphate. Part 4. Jute

    AU - Stewart, Derek

    N1 - No DOI available

    PY - 2000

    Y1 - 2000

    N2 - The effect of peroxymonosulphate (Oxone) as an activating agent for the delignification of jute has been studied. Activation conditions were varied in the following ranges: Oxone0-200 gL-1 and temperature 30-100°. Delignification was followed by extraction with 1 M NaOH. The residues were analysed for lignin and residual neutral sugar composition both before and after alkali extraction. Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectra of the residues after alkali extraction were analysed. Treatment of jute with acid alone showed that the constituent NCPs were relatively resistant to acidolysis even at 100°, although there was evidence of acidolysis of lignin-carbohydrate linkages in the corresponding DRIFT spectra. Treatment with acidic Oxonereduced residual levels of both lignin and non-cellulosic polysaccharides. Subsequent extraction of the residues with 1 M NaOH produced greater reductions. Delignification exhibited a direct relationship with both temperature and Oxone concentration, resulting in a maximum level of lignin removal of 97%. There was evidence that some of the constituent pectic polysaccharides and glucomannan were linked to lignin, Oxoneproved to be an effective bleaching agent and produced increased levels of brightness with increasing temperature and Oxoneconcentration. In some cases, equivalent levels of brightness were achieved by concurrently increasing the temperature and decreasing the Oxoneconcentration.©Academiei Române

    AB - The effect of peroxymonosulphate (Oxone) as an activating agent for the delignification of jute has been studied. Activation conditions were varied in the following ranges: Oxone0-200 gL-1 and temperature 30-100°. Delignification was followed by extraction with 1 M NaOH. The residues were analysed for lignin and residual neutral sugar composition both before and after alkali extraction. Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectra of the residues after alkali extraction were analysed. Treatment of jute with acid alone showed that the constituent NCPs were relatively resistant to acidolysis even at 100°, although there was evidence of acidolysis of lignin-carbohydrate linkages in the corresponding DRIFT spectra. Treatment with acidic Oxonereduced residual levels of both lignin and non-cellulosic polysaccharides. Subsequent extraction of the residues with 1 M NaOH produced greater reductions. Delignification exhibited a direct relationship with both temperature and Oxone concentration, resulting in a maximum level of lignin removal of 97%. There was evidence that some of the constituent pectic polysaccharides and glucomannan were linked to lignin, Oxoneproved to be an effective bleaching agent and produced increased levels of brightness with increasing temperature and Oxoneconcentration. In some cases, equivalent levels of brightness were achieved by concurrently increasing the temperature and decreasing the Oxoneconcentration.©Academiei Române

    KW - natural fiber

    KW - jute

    KW - chemical modification

    KW - delignification

    KW - bleaching

    KW - peroxomonosulfates

    KW - optimization

    KW - operating conditions

    KW - Experimental study

    M3 - Article

    VL - 34

    SP - 287

    EP - 298

    JO - Cellulose Chemistry and Technology

    JF - Cellulose Chemistry and Technology

    SN - 0576-9787

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    ER -