The combined influence of hydrophobicity, charge and molecular weight on natural organic matter removal by ion exchange and coagulation

P. Finkbeiner, G. Moore, R. Pereira, B. Jefferson, P. Jarvis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three different source waters were investigated using virgin and pre-used anion exchange resins, coagulation, and ion exchange combined with coagulation (IEX&Coagulation). The hydrophobicity, size distribution and charge of natural organic matter (NOM) were used to evaluate its removal. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal by pre-used IEX resin was 67–79%. A consistent ratio of different hydrophobicity fractions was found in the removed DOC, while the proportion and quantity of the molecular weight fraction around 1 kDa was important in understanding the treatability of water. For pre-used resin, organic compounds were hypothesised to be restricted to easily accessible exchange sites. Comparatively, virgin resin achieved higher DOC removals (86–89%) as resin fouling was absent. Charge density and the proportion of the hydrophobic fraction were found to be important indicators for the specific disinfection byproduct formation potential (DBP-FP). Treatment of raw water with pre-used resin decreased the specific DBP-FP by between 2 and 43%, while the use of virgin resin resulted in a reduction of between 31 and 63%. The highest water quality was achieved when the combination of IEX and coagulation was used, reducing DOC and the specific DBP-FP well below that seen for either process alone.
Original languageEnglish
Article number124633
JournalChemosphere
Volume238
Early online date21 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Charge density
  • Disinfection byproducts
  • Ion exchange
  • Natural organic matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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