Task-involved versus Ego-Involved: Motivating children to exercise in a pervasive exergame

Andrew MacVean

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper presents current work on a pervasive health and fitness game (exergame), designed to motivate children to reach their recommended daily exercise goals and facilitate long term behavioural change. I discuss briefly the current work in the area of pervasive exergames and highlight a common theme in the approach they take. Through my study of the relevant psychology literature, I identify a potential problem in this approach - the goal context that the majority of systems adopt. I hypothesize that a Task-Involved rather than an Ego-Involved system would be more suitable at addressing the problem of sedentary childhood behaviour. Finally, this paper outlines the design requirements of a pervasive exergame with the aim of assessing whether one goal context proves more motivating than the other. © 2011 IEEE.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2011 IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops, PERCOM Workshops 2011
Pages405-406
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event2011 9th IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: 21 Mar 201125 Mar 2011

Conference

Conference2011 9th IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops
Abbreviated titlePERCOM Workshops 2011
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period21/03/1125/03/11

Keywords

  • exergames
  • location-aware
  • motivation
  • pervasive games
  • ubiquitous computing

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