Systematic review of effectiveness of universal self-regulation-based interventions and their effects on distal health and social outcomes in children and adolescents: Review protocol

Anuja Pandey, Daniel Hale, Anne Lise Goddings, Sarah Jayne Blakemore, Russell Viner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
19 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Growing evidence suggests that childhood and adolescence self-regulation contributes to multiple health, educational and social outcomes. Considering the potential impact of self-regulation skills on improved life chances in conjunction with evidence suggesting that self-regulation can be modified by interventions, there is a need to identify interventions which are most effective in improving childhood and adolescence self-regulation. The present systematic review was designed to determine the effectiveness of universal interventions focused on enhancing the self-regulation of children and adolescents. As secondary outcomes, we will also examine the effectiveness of such interventions on distal health and social outcomes. Methods: Eligible studies include randomised controlled trials (including cluster randomised trials) reporting on universal interventions designed to improve self-regulation in childhood and adolescence (age 0-19years). The following databases will be searched for peer-reviewed publications using an iterative search strategy: Medline, PsycINFO, EMBASE, ERIC, CINAHL Plus, British Education Index, Child Development & Adolescent Studies and CENTRAL without applying language or date filters. Additionally, reference lists and citations of included studies will be searched for eligible studies. A 10% proportion of the total titles and abstracts will be randomly selected and screened independently by two reviewers (AP and DH). Results will be compared to ensure less than 5% discrepancy, followed by screening of all results by one reviewer (AP). Full-text review and data collection will be independently performed by two reviewers. Any discrepancies will be solved by mutual discussion, and if unresolved, a third reviewer (RV) will be consulted. Meta-analysis will be conducted to quantify trial effects, if the data is sufficiently homogenous to allow quantitative synthesis. Otherwise, results will be described narratively. Discussion: The evidence derived from the systematic review will strengthen the evidence base to inform planning of effective interventions targeting self-regulation skills in childhood and adolescence. This will benefit policy makers, academicians, researchers, health professionals, and also, young people who will benefit from policy and interventions informed by this review. Systematic review registration:CRD42016047661.

Original languageEnglish
Article number175
JournalSystematic Reviews
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Aug 2017

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Children
  • Interventions
  • Self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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