Sustainable hydrogen production for fuel cells by steam reforming of ethylene glycol: A consideration of reaction thermodynamics

Na Wang, Noemie Perret, Alexander Foster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of renewable biomass, such as ethylene glycol (EG), for hydrogen production offers a more sustainable system compared to natural gas and petroleum reforming. For the first time, the reaction thermodynamics of steam reforming and sorption enhanced steam reforming of EG have been investigated. Gibbs free energy minimization method was used to study the effect of pressure (1-5 atm), temperature (500-1100 K) and water to EG ratio (WER 0-8) on the production of hydrogen and the formation of associated by-products (CH 4, CO2, CO, C). The results suggest that hydrogen production is optimum when steam reforming occurs at atmospheric pressure, 925 K and with a WER of 8. Moreover, working at high temperature (>900 K) and with a WER above 6 inhibits almost entirely the production of methane and carbon. The main source of hydrogen in the system is found to be steam reforming of methane and water gas shift reaction by the analysis of the response reactions (RERs). Hydrogen production is governed by the former reaction at low temperatures while the latter one comes into prominence as temperature increases. By coupling with in situ CO2 capture using CaO, the formation of CO2 and CO can be avoided and high purity of hydrogen (>99%) can be achieved. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5932-5940
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy
Volume36
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Keywords

  • Ethylene glycol steam reforming
  • Hydrogen
  • Reaction thermodynamics
  • Response reaction
  • Sorption enhanced

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