Sulfoevernan, a polyanionic polysaccharide, and the narcissus lectin potently inhibit HIV infection by binding to viral envelope protein

B.E. Weiler, H.C. Schröder, V. Stefanovich, D. Stewart, J.M.S. Forrest, L.B. Allen, B.J. Bowden, M.H. Kreuter, R. Voth, W.E.G. Müller

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Sulphoevernan is a sulphated a-1 ? 3, 1 ? 4 polyglucan (Mr 20000) with a helical structure. This compound effectively inhibits both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 infection of cells in vitro at concentrations around 0.5 µg/ml. Moreover, the compound completely inhibits HIV-1-induced syncytium formation at a concentration of 1 µg/ml. Competition experiments with 35S-labelled sulphoevernan revealed that the mannose-specific lectin from Narcissus pseudonarcissus prevented binding of sulphoevernan to HIV-1, whereas the antibody OKT4A did not reduce the amount of sulphoevernan bound to MT-2 cells. These data indicate that the non-cytotoxic polymer sulphoevernan binds to the virus rather than to the host cell. In vivo studies, using Rauscher leukaemia virus in NMRI mice, revealed that, at a daily dose of 20 mg/kg, the animals were protected against virus-induced increases in spleen weight. From these in vitro and in vivo data we conclude that sulphoevernan has potential in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
    © SOCIETY FOR GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1957-1963
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of General Virology
    Volume71
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 1990

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