Stress and shear fracture (fault) patterns resulting from a suite of complicated boundary conditions with applications to the Wind River Mountains

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Airy stress function is used, via the Principle of Superposition and the series summation concept, to obtain stress states in a static, self-gravitating elastic beam subjected to boundary stresses. The boundary conditions investigated are more complicated than those previously published and include cases with sawtooth-, step-, and sinusoidally-shaped lower-boundary loads, with and without additional tectonic end leads. Potential shear fracture (fault) patterns derived from the calculated stress fields indicate co-existing (simultaneous) regions of lateral shortening and extension. Application of one of the cases to the study of the structural geometry of the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming yields a good 'fit' and forms a possible explanation for the observed rotations and zones of shortening and extension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-133
Number of pages21
JournalPure and Applied Geophysics
Volume115
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1977

Keywords

  • Fracture patterns
  • Stress due to loading
  • Stress field

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

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