Stop Annoying Me! An Empirical Investigation of the Usability of App Privacy Notifications

Nicholas Micallef, Mike Just, Lynne Baillie, Maher Alharby

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Privacy nudges are a “soft-paternalistic” method to nudge (instead of force) users to make more informed privacy decisions. Current implementations of privacy nudges are considered to be annoying. Previous research found that modalities influence the effectiveness of responses to system messages. Hence, with the aim of improving the usability of privacy nudges, we empirically investigate how users perceive receiving privacy nudges using different modalities. Our results suggest that app designers should implement privacy nudges which cede the decision of their delivery time to the users themselves. Most importantly, our findings reveal that to minimize annoyance, intrusiveness and interruption, while still being read, low priority notifications should not be delivered using salient modalities (i.e., audio or speech).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 29th Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages371-375
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781450353793
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Nov 2017
Event29th Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 28 Nov 20171 Dec 2017
http://www.ozchi.org/2017/

Conference

Conference29th Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
Abbreviated titleOzCHI 2017
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period28/11/171/12/17
Internet address

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    Micallef, N., Just, M., Baillie, L., & Alharby, M. (2017). Stop Annoying Me! An Empirical Investigation of the Usability of App Privacy Notifications. In Proceedings of the 29th Australian Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (pp. 371-375). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/3152771.3156139