Sensorless position detection using neural networks for the control of switched reluctance motors

D. S. Reay, B. W. Williams

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For high performance position or torque control, or for many of the different possible approaches to torque ripple and acoustic noise reduction in a switched reluctance motor (SRM), position feedback is essential. However, optical position encoders add to the complexity and cost of SRMs, compromising some of their main advantages. This paper describes a novel method of sensorless position detection requiring no special converter or sensor circuitry, and which does not rely on accurate prior knowledge of the magnetic characteristics of the motor. The approach described is novel in two respects. Firstly, it does not rely on accurate prior knowledge of phase winding inductance but merely makes the assumption that it varies substantially as sin(Nr?), where Nr is the number of rotor poles and ? is rotor angle. Secondly, the approach learns from previous good estimates of position and, once it has done so, makes use of this knowledge where performance of the basic estimation algorithm degrades (principally at low speeds of rotation). The technique has been investigated in simulation and a hardware implementation is under development.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 1999 IEEE International Conference on Control Applications (CCA) and IEEE International Symposium on Computer Aided Control System Design (CACSD)
Pages1073-1077
Number of pages5
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 1999
Event1999 IEEE International Conference on Control Applications and IEEE International Symposium on Computer Aided Control System Design - Kohala Coast, HI, United States
Duration: 22 Aug 199927 Aug 1999

Conference

Conference1999 IEEE International Conference on Control Applications and IEEE International Symposium on Computer Aided Control System Design
CountryUnited States
CityKohala Coast, HI
Period22/08/9927/08/99

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