Self-healing performance of engineered cementitious composites under natural environmental exposure

Benny Suryanto, Sam Alan Wilson, William John McCarter, T Malcolm Chrisp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The self-healing performance of an engineered cementitious composite (ECC) exposed to the natural environment is presented.  Fifteen dog-bone shaped ECC samples were preloaded after 14 days of curing and then placed outside in an open area at Heriot-Watt University (Edinburgh campus).  Ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements were used to determine the rate and extent of the self-healing capabilities of the ECC in the natural environment.  The results showed that, while the more highly damaged samples displayed the greatest decrease in ultrasonic velocity, they also displayed initial accelerated healing, which implies an increased quantity of individual cracks in the more damaged samples rather than an increase in individual crack widths.  It was also found that the self-healing of microcracks in the ECC was robust.  Narrow hairline cracks (< 10 μm width) healed in less than 6 d, while 20–30 μm wide cracks either partially or fully healed after 6 days of intermittent rainfall.  Wider microcracks (40–75 μm) partially healed after 3 weeks of outdoor exposure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-220
Number of pages10
JournalAdvances in Cement Research
Volume28
Issue number4
Early online date15 Dec 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

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title = "Self-healing performance of engineered cementitious composites under natural environmental exposure",
abstract = "The self-healing performance of an engineered cementitious composite (ECC) exposed to the natural environment is presented.  Fifteen dog-bone shaped ECC samples were preloaded after 14 days of curing and then placed outside in an open area at Heriot-Watt University (Edinburgh campus).  Ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements were used to determine the rate and extent of the self-healing capabilities of the ECC in the natural environment.  The results showed that, while the more highly damaged samples displayed the greatest decrease in ultrasonic velocity, they also displayed initial accelerated healing, which implies an increased quantity of individual cracks in the more damaged samples rather than an increase in individual crack widths.  It was also found that the self-healing of microcracks in the ECC was robust.  Narrow hairline cracks (< 10 μm width) healed in less than 6 d, while 20–30 μm wide cracks either partially or fully healed after 6 days of intermittent rainfall.  Wider microcracks (40–75 μm) partially healed after 3 weeks of outdoor exposure.",
author = "Benny Suryanto and Wilson, {Sam Alan} and McCarter, {William John} and Chrisp, {T Malcolm}",
note = "Email correspondence from publisher regarding upload of AAM: {"}From: Abigail Neale [abigail.neale@icepublishing.com] Sent: Thursday, August 06, 2015 10:55 AM To: Suryanto, Benny Subject: RE: Your ACR paper has been published online Dear Benny, No this should be fine as long as it is only accessible for members of your institution and not open to the general public. Thank you for letting me know. Kind regards, Abigail{"}",
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Self-healing performance of engineered cementitious composites under natural environmental exposure. / Suryanto, Benny; Wilson, Sam Alan; McCarter, William John; Chrisp, T Malcolm.

In: Advances in Cement Research, Vol. 28, No. 4, 04.2016, p. 211-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Self-healing performance of engineered cementitious composites under natural environmental exposure

AU - Suryanto, Benny

AU - Wilson, Sam Alan

AU - McCarter, William John

AU - Chrisp, T Malcolm

N1 - Email correspondence from publisher regarding upload of AAM: "From: Abigail Neale [abigail.neale@icepublishing.com] Sent: Thursday, August 06, 2015 10:55 AM To: Suryanto, Benny Subject: RE: Your ACR paper has been published online Dear Benny, No this should be fine as long as it is only accessible for members of your institution and not open to the general public. Thank you for letting me know. Kind regards, Abigail"

PY - 2016/4

Y1 - 2016/4

N2 - The self-healing performance of an engineered cementitious composite (ECC) exposed to the natural environment is presented.  Fifteen dog-bone shaped ECC samples were preloaded after 14 days of curing and then placed outside in an open area at Heriot-Watt University (Edinburgh campus).  Ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements were used to determine the rate and extent of the self-healing capabilities of the ECC in the natural environment.  The results showed that, while the more highly damaged samples displayed the greatest decrease in ultrasonic velocity, they also displayed initial accelerated healing, which implies an increased quantity of individual cracks in the more damaged samples rather than an increase in individual crack widths.  It was also found that the self-healing of microcracks in the ECC was robust.  Narrow hairline cracks (< 10 μm width) healed in less than 6 d, while 20–30 μm wide cracks either partially or fully healed after 6 days of intermittent rainfall.  Wider microcracks (40–75 μm) partially healed after 3 weeks of outdoor exposure.

AB - The self-healing performance of an engineered cementitious composite (ECC) exposed to the natural environment is presented.  Fifteen dog-bone shaped ECC samples were preloaded after 14 days of curing and then placed outside in an open area at Heriot-Watt University (Edinburgh campus).  Ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements were used to determine the rate and extent of the self-healing capabilities of the ECC in the natural environment.  The results showed that, while the more highly damaged samples displayed the greatest decrease in ultrasonic velocity, they also displayed initial accelerated healing, which implies an increased quantity of individual cracks in the more damaged samples rather than an increase in individual crack widths.  It was also found that the self-healing of microcracks in the ECC was robust.  Narrow hairline cracks (< 10 μm width) healed in less than 6 d, while 20–30 μm wide cracks either partially or fully healed after 6 days of intermittent rainfall.  Wider microcracks (40–75 μm) partially healed after 3 weeks of outdoor exposure.

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