Removal of Congo red dye from industrial effluents using metal oxide-clay nanocomposites: Insight into adsorption and precipitation mechanisms

T. E. Rasilingwani, J. R. Gumbo, V. Masindi, S. Foteinis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
58 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The efficacy of magnesium oxide (MgO)-bentonite clay nanocomposite particles (MgO nanoparticles embedded in powdered bentonite clay) for water and wastewater treatment applications is examined herein. Congo red (CR), a widely used azo dye, was used as the model contaminant. For CR concentrations ≤120 mg/L, the optimum nanocomposite dosage was ≤1 g/L, achieving CR removal ≥99% for contact times (mixing durations) ≤10 min, whereas temperature and pH had no significant effect on the treatment process. The removal of CR dye followed the pseudo-second-order model than the first order model. Furthermore, adsorption isotherms followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm rather than the Freundlich adsorption isotherm (R2 ≥ 0.99), hence confirming monolayer homogenous adsorption. The surface morphological and physicochemical characteristics of the nanocomposite were also identified, and results suggest that CR removal was governed by electrostatic attraction between the protonated hydroxyl groups (i.e., -OH2+), embedded on the nanocomposite surface, and the negatively charged –SO3-groups of the CR dye. When used for the treatment of real printing ink wastewater, CR was practically removed (⁓100%), whereas for real printing and dyeing wastewater (PDW), a more challenging effluent that also contains salts and other contaminants, CR removal was ≥80%. Overall, the produced MgO-bentonite clay nanocomposite hold great promise for sustainable CR removal, a typical contaminant that is released by many industries including printing, tannery and textile, paper, plastic, and paint and coatings.
Original languageEnglish
Article number100253
JournalWater Resources and Industry
Volume31
Early online date15 Mar 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2024

Keywords

  • Adsorption
  • Bentonite clay
  • Calcined magnesite
  • Dyes
  • Isotherms
  • Kinetics
  • Nanocomposite
  • Pigments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

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