Reliability of MRSI brain temperature mapping at 1.5 and 3 T

Michael J Thrippleton, Jehill Parikh, Bridget A Harris, Steven J Hammer, Scott I K Semple, Peter J D Andrews, Joanna M Wardlaw, Ian Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

MRSI permits the non-invasive mapping of brain temperature in vivo, but information regarding its reliability is lacking. We obtained MRSI data from 31 healthy male volunteers [age range, 22-40 years; mean +/- standard deviation (SD), 30.5 +/- 5.0 years]. Eleven subjects (age range, 23-40 years; mean +/- SD, 30.5 +/- 5.2 years) were invited to receive four point-resolved spectroscopy MRSI scans on each of 3 days in both 1.5-T (TR/TE=1000/144 ms) and 3-T (TR/TE=1700/144 ms) clinical scanners; a further 20 subjects (age range, 22-40 years; mean +/- SD, 30.5 +/- 4.9 years) were scanned on a single occasion at 3 T. Data were fitted in the time domain to determine the water-N-acetylaspartate chemical shift difference, from which the temperature was estimated. Temperature data were analysed using a linear mixed effects model to determine variance components and systematic temperature changes during the scanning sessions. To characterise the effects of instrumental drift on apparent MRSI brain temperature, a temperature-controlled phantom was constructed and scanned on multiple occasions. Components of apparent in vivo temperature variability at 1.5 T/3 T caused by inter-subject (0.18/0.17 degrees C), inter-session (0.18/0.15 degrees C) and within-session (0.36/0.14 degrees C) effects, as well as voxel-to-voxel variation (0.59/0.54 degrees C), were determined. There was a brain cooling effect during in vivo MRSI of 0.10 degrees C [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.110, -0.094 degrees C; p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-190
Number of pages8
JournalNMR in Biomedicine
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • spectroscopic imaging
  • spectroscopic quantification
  • normal brain
  • temperature
  • thermometry
  • ACUTE ISCHEMIC-STROKE
  • MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-SPECTROSCOPY
  • BODY-TEMPERATURE
  • INTRACRANIAL TEMPERATURE
  • PRIOR KNOWLEDGE
  • THERMOMETRY
  • QUANTIFICATION
  • VALIDATION
  • ACCURATE
  • HUMANS

Cite this

Thrippleton, M. J., Parikh, J., Harris, B. A., Hammer, S. J., Semple, S. I. K., Andrews, P. J. D., Wardlaw, J. M., & Marshall, I. (2014). Reliability of MRSI brain temperature mapping at 1.5 and 3 T. NMR in Biomedicine, 27(2), 183-190. https://doi.org/10.1002/nbm.3050