Reading the signs: Impact of signed versus written questionnaires on the prevalence of psychopathology among deaf adolescents

Andy Cornes, Meg J. Rohan, Jemina Napier, Joseph M. Rey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    25 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: There are no empirically validated measures of psychopathology that can be easily understood by signing deaf children and little reliable data on the prevalence of psychiatric disturbance in this population. The aim was to meet this need by developing an Australian Sign Language (Auslan) version of a widely used measure (the Youth Self-Report; YSR) which could be administered in an interactive CD-ROM format, to assess its reliability, and to compare the prevalence of clinically significant psychopathology in deaf adolescents when using the Auslan questionnaire versus the standard written version. This would also allow examining the validity of written questionnaires in this population. Method: Twenty-nine male and 25 female adolescents with severe or profound hearing loss from public and private schools in the Australian States of Tasmania (n = 11) and New South Wales (n = 43) agreed to participate and completed the written and the interactive Auslan versions of the YSR. Pa
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)665 - 673
    JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
    Volume40
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Keywords

    • sign language, psychopathology, translation, instruments

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