Quantum-inspired computational imaging

Yoann Altmann, Stephen McLaughlin, Miles J. Padgett, Vivek K. Goyal, Alfred O. Hero, Daniele Franco Angelo Faccio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Traditional imaging techniques involve peering down a lens and collecting as much light from the target scene as possible. That requirement can set limits on what can be seen. Altmann et al. review some of the most recent developments in the field of computational imaging, including full three-dimensional imaging of scenes that are hidden from direct view (e.g., around a corner or behind an obstacle). High-resolution imaging can be achieved with a single-pixel detector at wavelengths for which no cameras currently exist. Such advances will lead to the development of cameras that can see through fog or inside the human body.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScience
Volume361
Issue number6403
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Aug 2018

Fingerprint

cameras
fog
human body
imaging techniques
pixels
lenses
requirements
high resolution
detectors
wavelengths

Cite this

Altmann, Y., McLaughlin, S., Padgett, M. J., Goyal, V. K., Hero, A. O., & Faccio, D. F. A. (2018). Quantum-inspired computational imaging. Science, 361(6403). https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aat2298
Altmann, Yoann ; McLaughlin, Stephen ; Padgett, Miles J. ; Goyal, Vivek K. ; Hero, Alfred O. ; Faccio, Daniele Franco Angelo. / Quantum-inspired computational imaging. In: Science. 2018 ; Vol. 361, No. 6403.
@article{f383e5efbdaf4a4dbe706d6f8b85be60,
title = "Quantum-inspired computational imaging",
abstract = "Traditional imaging techniques involve peering down a lens and collecting as much light from the target scene as possible. That requirement can set limits on what can be seen. Altmann et al. review some of the most recent developments in the field of computational imaging, including full three-dimensional imaging of scenes that are hidden from direct view (e.g., around a corner or behind an obstacle). High-resolution imaging can be achieved with a single-pixel detector at wavelengths for which no cameras currently exist. Such advances will lead to the development of cameras that can see through fog or inside the human body.",
author = "Yoann Altmann and Stephen McLaughlin and Padgett, {Miles J.} and Goyal, {Vivek K.} and Hero, {Alfred O.} and Faccio, {Daniele Franco Angelo}",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1126/science.aat2298",
language = "English",
volume = "361",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "6403",

}

Altmann, Y, McLaughlin, S, Padgett, MJ, Goyal, VK, Hero, AO & Faccio, DFA 2018, 'Quantum-inspired computational imaging', Science, vol. 361, no. 6403. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aat2298

Quantum-inspired computational imaging. / Altmann, Yoann; McLaughlin, Stephen; Padgett, Miles J.; Goyal, Vivek K.; Hero, Alfred O.; Faccio, Daniele Franco Angelo.

In: Science, Vol. 361, No. 6403, 17.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantum-inspired computational imaging

AU - Altmann, Yoann

AU - McLaughlin, Stephen

AU - Padgett, Miles J.

AU - Goyal, Vivek K.

AU - Hero, Alfred O.

AU - Faccio, Daniele Franco Angelo

PY - 2018/8/17

Y1 - 2018/8/17

N2 - Traditional imaging techniques involve peering down a lens and collecting as much light from the target scene as possible. That requirement can set limits on what can be seen. Altmann et al. review some of the most recent developments in the field of computational imaging, including full three-dimensional imaging of scenes that are hidden from direct view (e.g., around a corner or behind an obstacle). High-resolution imaging can be achieved with a single-pixel detector at wavelengths for which no cameras currently exist. Such advances will lead to the development of cameras that can see through fog or inside the human body.

AB - Traditional imaging techniques involve peering down a lens and collecting as much light from the target scene as possible. That requirement can set limits on what can be seen. Altmann et al. review some of the most recent developments in the field of computational imaging, including full three-dimensional imaging of scenes that are hidden from direct view (e.g., around a corner or behind an obstacle). High-resolution imaging can be achieved with a single-pixel detector at wavelengths for which no cameras currently exist. Such advances will lead to the development of cameras that can see through fog or inside the human body.

U2 - 10.1126/science.aat2298

DO - 10.1126/science.aat2298

M3 - Article

VL - 361

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 6403

ER -

Altmann Y, McLaughlin S, Padgett MJ, Goyal VK, Hero AO, Faccio DFA. Quantum-inspired computational imaging. Science. 2018 Aug 17;361(6403). https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aat2298