Preferences for communication in clinic from deaf people: A cross-sectional study

Anna Middleton, Graham H. Turner, Maria Bitner-Glindzicz, Peter Lewis, Martin Richards, Angus Clarke, Dafydd Stephens

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Aims and objectives To explore the preferences of deaf people for communication in a hospital consultation. Methods Design - cross-sectional survey, using a structured, postal questionnaire. Setting - survey of readers of two journals for deaf and hard of hearing people. Participants - 999 self-selected individuals with hearing loss in the UK, including those who use sign language and those who use speech. Main outcome measures - preferred mode of communication. Results A total of 11% of participants preferred to use sign language within everyday life, 70% used speech and 17% used a mixture of sign and speech. Within a clinic setting, 50% of the sign language users preferred to have a consultation via a sign language interpreter and 43% indicated they would prefer to only have a consultation directly with a signing health professional; 7% would accept a consultation in speech as long as there was good deaf awareness from the health professional, indicated by a knowledge of lip-reading/speech-reading. Of the deaf speech users, 98% preferred to have a consultation in speech and of this group 71% indicated that they would only accept this if the health professional had good deaf awareness. Among the participants who used a mixture of sign language and speech, only 5% said they could cope with a consultation in speech with no deaf awareness whereas 46% were accepting of a spoken consultation as long as it was provided with good deaf awareness; 30% preferred to use an interpreter and 14% preferred to have a consultation directly with a signing health professional. Conclusions The hospital communication preferences for most people with deafness could be met by increasing deaf awareness training for health professionals, a greater provision of specialized sign language interpreters and of health professionals who can use fluent sign language directly with clients in areas where contact with deaf people is frequent. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)811-817
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
    Volume16
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

    Fingerprint

    Sign Language
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Communication
    Referral and Consultation
    Health
    Lipreading
    Deafness
    Hearing Loss
    Hearing
    Reading
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    Keywords

    • communication
    • deafness
    • hospital consultation
    • interpreter
    • sign language

    Cite this

    Middleton, Anna ; Turner, Graham H. ; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria ; Lewis, Peter ; Richards, Martin ; Clarke, Angus ; Stephens, Dafydd. / Preferences for communication in clinic from deaf people : A cross-sectional study. In: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 811-817.
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    abstract = "Aims and objectives To explore the preferences of deaf people for communication in a hospital consultation. Methods Design - cross-sectional survey, using a structured, postal questionnaire. Setting - survey of readers of two journals for deaf and hard of hearing people. Participants - 999 self-selected individuals with hearing loss in the UK, including those who use sign language and those who use speech. Main outcome measures - preferred mode of communication. Results A total of 11{\%} of participants preferred to use sign language within everyday life, 70{\%} used speech and 17{\%} used a mixture of sign and speech. Within a clinic setting, 50{\%} of the sign language users preferred to have a consultation via a sign language interpreter and 43{\%} indicated they would prefer to only have a consultation directly with a signing health professional; 7{\%} would accept a consultation in speech as long as there was good deaf awareness from the health professional, indicated by a knowledge of lip-reading/speech-reading. Of the deaf speech users, 98{\%} preferred to have a consultation in speech and of this group 71{\%} indicated that they would only accept this if the health professional had good deaf awareness. Among the participants who used a mixture of sign language and speech, only 5{\%} said they could cope with a consultation in speech with no deaf awareness whereas 46{\%} were accepting of a spoken consultation as long as it was provided with good deaf awareness; 30{\%} preferred to use an interpreter and 14{\%} preferred to have a consultation directly with a signing health professional. Conclusions The hospital communication preferences for most people with deafness could be met by increasing deaf awareness training for health professionals, a greater provision of specialized sign language interpreters and of health professionals who can use fluent sign language directly with clients in areas where contact with deaf people is frequent. {\circledC} 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
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    Middleton, A, Turner, GH, Bitner-Glindzicz, M, Lewis, P, Richards, M, Clarke, A & Stephens, D 2010, 'Preferences for communication in clinic from deaf people: A cross-sectional study', Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 811-817. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2753.2009.01207.x

    Preferences for communication in clinic from deaf people : A cross-sectional study. / Middleton, Anna; Turner, Graham H.; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Lewis, Peter; Richards, Martin; Clarke, Angus; Stephens, Dafydd.

    In: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, Vol. 16, No. 4, 08.2010, p. 811-817.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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