Potential artifacts and misinterpretations when evaluating the ecotoxicological effects of nanomaterials

E. J. Petersen, T. B. Henry, J. Zhao, R. I. MacCuspie, T. L. Kirschling, V. Hackley, B. Xing, J. C. White

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have significant commercial potential in a broad range of industries for consumer products as a result of their novel properties. However, these same properties may cause unexpected risks once ENMs are released into the environment either intentionally or unintentionally. Thus, standard methods are needed to accurately and reproducibly assess the potential risk of ENMs. One factor that limits the applicability of standard ecotoxicology test methods for use with ENMs is that the unique behaviors of ENMs may cause artifacts or misinterpretations in these tests as a result of their unique behaviors. We briefly discuss these artifacts and misinterpretations and provide an illustrative example.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNanotechnology 2014
Subtitle of host publicationElectronics, Manufacturing, Environment, Energy & Water Technical Proceedings of the 2014 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo
PublisherCRC Press
Pages123-126
Number of pages4
Volume3
ISBN (Print)9781482258301
Publication statusPublished - 11 Jun 2014
EventNanotechnology 2014: Electronics, Manufacturing, Environment, Energy and Water - Washington, DC, United Kingdom
Duration: 15 Jun 201418 Jun 2014

Conference

ConferenceNanotechnology 2014: Electronics, Manufacturing, Environment, Energy and Water
Abbreviated titleNSTI-Nanotech 2014
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityWashington, DC
Period15/06/1418/06/14

Keywords

  • Artifacts
  • Nanoecotoxicology
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanoparticle
  • Standard test methods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

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