Physical and institutional requalification for long-term ‘place-keeping’: experiences from open space regeneration in the United Kingdom

Harry Smith, Marcia Pereira, Mel Burton

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    This paper draws on new institutionalist writings in planning and urban design which have focused on the different types of relations involved in the social production of space. It develops an analytical framework which it applies to the analysis of a series of open space regeneration projects in urban settings in the UK where innovative approaches have been taken to stakeholder involvement and partnerships in their design and management. The paper highlights the importance of organisational design (not only physical ‘place-making’ design) which is inclusive, in order to transform the mental models users and managers have of these open spaces. This transformation may help bring about a ‘requalification’ of people’s attitudes and approaches to these spaces as well as of the spaces themselves, therefore, furthering more sustainable long-term ‘place-keeping’. This research is part of an ongoing EU-funded four-year action-research project called “Making Places Profitable – Public and Private open spaces” (MP4).

    Conference

    ConferenceInternational Association of People-Environment Studies, Culture & Space in the Built Environment Network & Housing Network International Symposium on Revitalising Built Environments: Requalifying Old Places for New Uses
    CountryTurkey
    CityIstanbul
    Period12/10/0916/10/09

    Keywords

    • Urban regeneration
    • Open space
    • New institutionalism
    • Place-keeping
    • Urban governance

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  • Cite this

    Smith, H., Pereira, M., & Burton, M. (2009). Physical and institutional requalification for long-term ‘place-keeping’: experiences from open space regeneration in the United Kingdom. Paper presented at International Association of People-Environment Studies, Culture & Space in the Built Environment Network & Housing Network International Symposium on Revitalising Built Environments: Requalifying Old Places for New Uses, Istanbul, Turkey.