Origins of non-equilibrium segregation theory

M. E. Glicksman, R. N. Hills

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nonequilibrium solute redistribution law that predicts phase constitution in binary alloys is usually attributed to E. Scheil. Earlier studies by G.H. Gulliver are occasionally cited, but are thought of as being either approximate or incomplete. It is shown here that Gulliver developed limit laws for nonequilibrium segregation in solidifying alloys no later than 1913, 30 years prior to Scheil's 1942 paper. For obscure reasons, Gulliver chose not to burden the reader of his paper with the details connecting his derivation to the now well-known power-law for solute segregation. By contrast, Scheil's integral form for this power-law was derived from a differential mass balance that provides the standard approach used to derive this important equation. The authors suggest on the basis of their research that this significant accomplishment in solidification theory should properly be shared by both researchers and called the Gulliver-Scheil equation. Non-equilibrium segregation models that self-consistently include complicated effects of "back diffusion" and dendritic side-branch coarsening are shown to be formally related to the original extension of Gulliver-Scheil developed by H.D. Brody and M.C. Flemings.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Merton C. Flemings Symposium on Solidification and Materials Processing
EditorsR. Abbaschian, H. Brody, A. Mortensen
Pages81-85
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2000
EventProceedings of the Merton C. Flemings Symposium on Solidification and Materials Processing - Cambridge, MA, United States
Duration: 28 Jun 200030 Jun 2000

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the Merton C. Flemings Symposium on Solidification and Materials Processing
CountryUnited States
CityCambridge, MA
Period28/06/0030/06/00

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  • Cite this

    Glicksman, M. E., & Hills, R. N. (2000). Origins of non-equilibrium segregation theory. In R. Abbaschian, H. Brody, & A. Mortensen (Eds.), Proceedings of the Merton C. Flemings Symposium on Solidification and Materials Processing (pp. 81-85)