Optical highways for computing architectural and topological issues

Julian A B Dines, John F. Snowdon, Neil McArdle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carefully designed patterned half-wave plates and related spatial positioning of the transmitter/receiver pairs are used to show how the available space-bandwidths of both the optical and optoelectronic systems can be utilized fully. Through extensive modeling and simulation of the optics and the optoelectronic interface, predictions are made regarding the uniqueness and precision of the various components with the consequent cost implications.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 1998 International Symposium on Information Theory
Pages195
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Event1998 International Symposium on Information Theory - Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
Duration: 14 Sep 199818 Sep 1998

Conference

Conference1998 International Symposium on Information Theory
Abbreviated titleCLEO/EUROPE'98
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow, Scotland
Period14/09/9818/09/98

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  • Cite this

    Dines, J. A. B., Snowdon, J. F., & McArdle, N. (1998). Optical highways for computing architectural and topological issues. In Proceedings of the 1998 International Symposium on Information Theory (pp. 195)