Operating spiral inertial microfluidics at concentrations up to 3.4x109 cells/ml for high-concentration dewatering of chlorella vulgaris

Catherine Hill, Nik Willoughby, Helen Bridle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Inertial focusing has been successfully applied to microalgal harvesting, predominantly utilizing low concentration cultures, with few examples greater than 1x107 cells/ml, and with limited success when applied to small microalgal species (<10μm). High concentration processing using inertial focusing has introduced challenges in achieving successful, high recovery, separation due to particle interactions interfering with the focusing performance. Here we utilized a spiral channel with Chlorella vulgaris (CCAP 211/21A) and report successful operation across algae concentrations of 2.9x107 - 3.4x109 cells/ml in our device. Future work aims to further increase performance through device parallelization and scale-up.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication24th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages657-658
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9781733419017
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Event24th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2020 - Virtual, Online
Duration: 4 Oct 20209 Oct 2020

Conference

Conference24th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2020
Abbreviated titleMicroTAS 2020
CityVirtual, Online
Period4/10/209/10/20

Keywords

  • Algal Dewatering/Harvesting
  • Inertial Focusing
  • Microalgae
  • Microfluidics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Control and Systems Engineering

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