New thermally crosslinkable electron beam resists: 2. Monomethyl itaconate-methyl methacrylate copolymers

A. F. Miles, J. M G Cowie, R. H. Bennett, D. R. Brambley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The lithographic evaluation of monomethyl itaconate (MMI) and methyl methacrylate copolymers as thermally crosslinkable electron beam resists is described. Their properties were investigated as a function of copolymer composition and primary molar mass in order to determine an optimum formulation for the preparation of high resolution resist patterns. Line and space test patterns with features < 0.5 µm have been prepared using copolymers containing 10 mol% MMI with lithographic sensitivity of ~ 80 µC cm-2 and resist contrast of ~4 cm2 µC-1 when developed in a mixture of n-butyl acetate and n-hexyl acetate. In accordance with previously published results, the electron exposure dose required to first destroy the pre-crosslinked fraction of the resist has been found to be very much less than the electron exposure dose required for the preparation of high resolution resist patterns. The results obtained in this work are compared to a theory of gel degradation originally developed to describe the solubilization of lignin from plant tissue, whereby the breakdown of the gel can be modelled using the statistics for random network formation, except applied in reverse. © 1992.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1932-1936
Number of pages5
JournalPolymer
Volume33
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 1992

Keywords

  • electron beam lithography
  • gel degradation
  • monomethyl itaconate copolymers
  • resist materials

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    Miles, A. F., Cowie, J. M. G., Bennett, R. H., & Brambley, D. R. (1992). New thermally crosslinkable electron beam resists: 2. Monomethyl itaconate-methyl methacrylate copolymers. Polymer, 33(9), 1932-1936.