Mycotoxins of Aspergillus clavatus

Toxicity of cytochalasin E, patulin, and extracts of contaminated barley malt

Teresa Maria Lopez-Diaz, Brian Flannigan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Brine shrimp and conductimetric Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioassays were used to investigate the toxicity of green barley malt prepared at 16 and 25°C from grain inoculated with a strain of Aspergillus clavatus known to produce the mycotoxins cytochalasin E and patulin during malting. Pure cytochalasin E was considerably more toxic to brine shrimp larvae than patulin (LC50 < 0.5 versus >30 µg ml-1). In contrast, patulin significantly inhibited growth-related change in conductance of S. cerevisiae cultures at a concentration of 10 µg ml-1, but cytochalasin E had no effect at 80 µg ml-1. Extracts of both 16 and 25°C malts contaminated with A. clavatus were toxic to brine shrimp larvae, but had only limited inhibitory effects on the growth of S. cerevisiae. Since concentrations of cytochalasin E in contaminated malts produced at 16°C are below or close to the limits of detection, the presence of other fungal metabolites toxic to brine shrimps in such malts is indicated.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1381-1385
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of Food Protection
    Volume60
    Issue number11
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 1997

    Fingerprint

    Aspergillus clavatus
    cytochalasins
    patulin
    malt
    Artemia
    mycotoxins
    barley
    toxicity
    Saccharomyces cerevisiae
    extracts
    malting
    larvae
    lethal concentration 50
    detection limit
    bioassays
    metabolites

    Keywords

    • Aspergillus clavatus
    • Cytochalasin E
    • Malting
    • Patulin
    • Toxicity

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Brine shrimp and conductimetric Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioassays were used to investigate the toxicity of green barley malt prepared at 16 and 25°C from grain inoculated with a strain of Aspergillus clavatus known to produce the mycotoxins cytochalasin E and patulin during malting. Pure cytochalasin E was considerably more toxic to brine shrimp larvae than patulin (LC50 < 0.5 versus >30 µg ml-1). In contrast, patulin significantly inhibited growth-related change in conductance of S. cerevisiae cultures at a concentration of 10 µg ml-1, but cytochalasin E had no effect at 80 µg ml-1. Extracts of both 16 and 25°C malts contaminated with A. clavatus were toxic to brine shrimp larvae, but had only limited inhibitory effects on the growth of S. cerevisiae. Since concentrations of cytochalasin E in contaminated malts produced at 16°C are below or close to the limits of detection, the presence of other fungal metabolites toxic to brine shrimps in such malts is indicated.",
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    Mycotoxins of Aspergillus clavatus : Toxicity of cytochalasin E, patulin, and extracts of contaminated barley malt. / Lopez-Diaz, Teresa Maria; Flannigan, Brian.

    In: Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 60, No. 11, 11.1997, p. 1381-1385.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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