Multimaterial 3D Printing Technique for Electronic Circuitry Using Photopolymer and Selective Metallization

Assel Ryspayeva, Adilet Zhakeyev, Marc P. Y. Desmulliez, Jose Marques-Hueso*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Herein, a 3D printing technique to enable the manufacturing of selectively plated polymer objects by photopolymer printing and copper metallization is presented. Metallized plastic has become popular in a number of industries due to its lightweight, flexibility of design, and cost-effective fabrication. Common metallization techniques require multiple pretreatment steps, such as surface etching, sensitization/activation, and acceleration. The proposed method, by eliminating the sensitization step, allows selective metallization of 3D-printed samples by direct plating. The method relies on the inclusion of silver seeds into a mixture of acrylate- and methacrylate-based monomers and oligomers, which enables direct electroless copper metallization following 3D printing. Ag(I) ions act as catalytic sites for copper deposition. Copper films grown with embedded 2 and 4 wt% Ag(I) seeds reach thicknesses of 5.7 ± 1.2 and 7.7 ± 1.3 μm, respectively. Furthermore, printing with pristine and silver-modified resins on the same sample allows selective plating: only the modified resin is plated leaving the pristine resin unaffected. A proof-of-concept temperature sensor is manufactured to demonstrate the performance of the printed interconnects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2201243
JournalAdvanced Engineering Materials
Volume24
Issue number12
Early online date7 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • circuitry
  • multimaterials
  • photopolymers
  • plating
  • selective metallization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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