Multilocus sequence typing reveals that Bacillus cereus strains isolated from clinical infections have distinct phylogenetic origins

Margaret Barker, Bishan Thakker, Fergus G. Priest

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Eight strains of Bacillus cereus isolated from bacteremia and soft tissue infections were assigned to seven sequence types (STs) by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Two strains from different locations had identical STs. The concatenated sequences of the seven STs were aligned with 65 concatenated sequences from reference STs and a neighbor-joining tree was constructed. Two strains were distantly related to all reference STs. Three strains were recovered in a clade that included Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and rare Bacillus thuringiensis strains while the other three strains were assigned to two STs that were more closely affiliated to most of the B. thuringiensis STs. We conclude that invasive B. cereus strains do not form a single clone or clonal complex of highly virulent strains. © 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)179-184
    Number of pages6
    JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
    Volume245
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2005

    Fingerprint

    Multilocus Sequence Typing
    Bacillus cereus
    Bacillus thuringiensis
    Infection
    Bacillus anthracis
    Soft Tissue Infections
    Bacteremia
    Clone Cells

    Keywords

    • Bacillus anthracis
    • Bacillus cereus
    • Bacillus thuringiensis
    • Clone
    • MLST
    • Phylogeny

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Eight strains of Bacillus cereus isolated from bacteremia and soft tissue infections were assigned to seven sequence types (STs) by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Two strains from different locations had identical STs. The concatenated sequences of the seven STs were aligned with 65 concatenated sequences from reference STs and a neighbor-joining tree was constructed. Two strains were distantly related to all reference STs. Three strains were recovered in a clade that included Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and rare Bacillus thuringiensis strains while the other three strains were assigned to two STs that were more closely affiliated to most of the B. thuringiensis STs. We conclude that invasive B. cereus strains do not form a single clone or clonal complex of highly virulent strains. {\circledC} 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.",
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    Multilocus sequence typing reveals that Bacillus cereus strains isolated from clinical infections have distinct phylogenetic origins. / Barker, Margaret; Thakker, Bishan; Priest, Fergus G.

    In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 245, No. 1, 01.04.2005, p. 179-184.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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