Multiculturalism in the devolved context: Minority ethnic negotiation of identity through engagement in the arts in Scotland

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article contributes to theorizing on multiculturalism by countering some previously identified criticisms of the notion of minority integration through cultural recognition. This is achieved by drawing on empirical evidence on identity construction and negotiation by minority ethnic communities through engagement in the arts.The socio-political context of the study is devolved Scotland, where multiculturalism is entangled with issues of national self-definition. The study reveals considerable interest by minority ethnic communities in engaging in the arts, particularly those associated with their ethnic background. However, such efforts are constrained by structural and cultural relations and differential power to claim resources from public organizations. The article argues that in the devolved context, minority ethnic communities' ability to claim interpretive space in the public arena is crucially dependent on the extent to which their claims to evolving representations of national culture are recognized within a wider drive to promote separate nationhood. Copyright © 2008.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)47-64
    Number of pages18
    JournalSociology
    Volume42
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008

    Fingerprint

    multicultural society
    national minority
    art
    community
    cultural relations
    national culture
    criticism
    minority
    ability
    resources
    evidence

    Keywords

    • Arts
    • Culture
    • Ethnicity
    • Identity
    • Multiculturalism
    • National

    Cite this

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    abstract = "This article contributes to theorizing on multiculturalism by countering some previously identified criticisms of the notion of minority integration through cultural recognition. This is achieved by drawing on empirical evidence on identity construction and negotiation by minority ethnic communities through engagement in the arts.The socio-political context of the study is devolved Scotland, where multiculturalism is entangled with issues of national self-definition. The study reveals considerable interest by minority ethnic communities in engaging in the arts, particularly those associated with their ethnic background. However, such efforts are constrained by structural and cultural relations and differential power to claim resources from public organizations. The article argues that in the devolved context, minority ethnic communities' ability to claim interpretive space in the public arena is crucially dependent on the extent to which their claims to evolving representations of national culture are recognized within a wider drive to promote separate nationhood. Copyright {\circledC} 2008.",
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