Modeling a surfactant preflush with non-aqueous and aqueous scale inhibitor squeeze treatments

O. Vazquez, E. Mackay, K. Al Shuaili, K. Sorbie, M. Jordan

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    The most common method for preventing downhole scale formation is by applying a scale inhibitor (SI) squeeze treatment. In this process, a SI solution is injected down a producer well into the near wellbore formation. Commonly, squeeze treatments comprise the following stages: a preflush, the main scale inhibitor pill, an overflush and a shut-in. This is followed by the resumption of production in the well. A surfactant preflush is often injected to "condition" the rock (by altering the wettability, resulting in enhanced SI retention). In these treatments, the main SI pill and overflush fluids may be either aqueous or non-aqueous. This paper presents a near-well radial SI squeeze model that can simulate the impact of a surfactant preflush on both inhibitor return concentrations and on well cleanup time. Specifically, we model the effect of surfactant injection on the reduction of residual water and oil saturations, and the results of these changes on enhanced SI adsorption. These may be considered reversible or irreversible processes. Data from scale inhibitor coreflood tests, in which a surfactant preflush was either included or was not, are used to constrain the model. Then we present a sensitivity study of the impact of the surfactant volume injected, and of the effect of surfactant adsorption onto the rock surface, on enhanced SI adsorption. Of particular interest is that enhanced SI adsorption due to the surfactant showed a significant impact on treatment lifetimes. Finally, an example is presented of modelling treatments in wells in an offshore sandstone reservoir where surfactant preflushes were applied. The modelling results are compared with the field return profiles. The value such a model brings to the interpretation of previously conducted squeeze treatments and to the design of new treatments is discussed in terms of optimisation of chemical cost and treatment lifetimes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationSociety of Petroleum Engineers - 70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition - Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2008
    Pages2219-2231
    Number of pages13
    Volume4
    Publication statusPublished - 2008
    Event70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition - Rome, Italy
    Duration: 9 Jun 200812 Jun 2008

    Conference

    Conference70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition
    Abbreviated titleSPE EUROPEC 2008
    CountryItaly
    CityRome
    Period9/06/0812/06/08

    Fingerprint

    surfactant
    inhibitor
    modeling
    adsorption
    well
    wettability
    cleanup
    rock
    sandstone
    saturation
    fluid
    oil

    Cite this

    Vazquez, O., Mackay, E., Al Shuaili, K., Sorbie, K., & Jordan, M. (2008). Modeling a surfactant preflush with non-aqueous and aqueous scale inhibitor squeeze treatments. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - 70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition - Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2008 (Vol. 4, pp. 2219-2231)
    Vazquez, O. ; Mackay, E. ; Al Shuaili, K. ; Sorbie, K. ; Jordan, M. / Modeling a surfactant preflush with non-aqueous and aqueous scale inhibitor squeeze treatments. Society of Petroleum Engineers - 70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition - Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2008. Vol. 4 2008. pp. 2219-2231
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    title = "Modeling a surfactant preflush with non-aqueous and aqueous scale inhibitor squeeze treatments",
    abstract = "The most common method for preventing downhole scale formation is by applying a scale inhibitor (SI) squeeze treatment. In this process, a SI solution is injected down a producer well into the near wellbore formation. Commonly, squeeze treatments comprise the following stages: a preflush, the main scale inhibitor pill, an overflush and a shut-in. This is followed by the resumption of production in the well. A surfactant preflush is often injected to {"}condition{"} the rock (by altering the wettability, resulting in enhanced SI retention). In these treatments, the main SI pill and overflush fluids may be either aqueous or non-aqueous. This paper presents a near-well radial SI squeeze model that can simulate the impact of a surfactant preflush on both inhibitor return concentrations and on well cleanup time. Specifically, we model the effect of surfactant injection on the reduction of residual water and oil saturations, and the results of these changes on enhanced SI adsorption. These may be considered reversible or irreversible processes. Data from scale inhibitor coreflood tests, in which a surfactant preflush was either included or was not, are used to constrain the model. Then we present a sensitivity study of the impact of the surfactant volume injected, and of the effect of surfactant adsorption onto the rock surface, on enhanced SI adsorption. Of particular interest is that enhanced SI adsorption due to the surfactant showed a significant impact on treatment lifetimes. Finally, an example is presented of modelling treatments in wells in an offshore sandstone reservoir where surfactant preflushes were applied. The modelling results are compared with the field return profiles. The value such a model brings to the interpretation of previously conducted squeeze treatments and to the design of new treatments is discussed in terms of optimisation of chemical cost and treatment lifetimes.",
    author = "O. Vazquez and E. Mackay and {Al Shuaili}, K. and K. Sorbie and M. Jordan",
    year = "2008",
    language = "English",
    isbn = "9781605604749",
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    Vazquez, O, Mackay, E, Al Shuaili, K, Sorbie, K & Jordan, M 2008, Modeling a surfactant preflush with non-aqueous and aqueous scale inhibitor squeeze treatments. in Society of Petroleum Engineers - 70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition - Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2008. vol. 4, pp. 2219-2231, 70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition, Rome, Italy, 9/06/08.

    Modeling a surfactant preflush with non-aqueous and aqueous scale inhibitor squeeze treatments. / Vazquez, O.; Mackay, E.; Al Shuaili, K.; Sorbie, K.; Jordan, M.

    Society of Petroleum Engineers - 70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition - Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2008. Vol. 4 2008. p. 2219-2231.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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    AU - Al Shuaili, K.

    AU - Sorbie, K.

    AU - Jordan, M.

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    N2 - The most common method for preventing downhole scale formation is by applying a scale inhibitor (SI) squeeze treatment. In this process, a SI solution is injected down a producer well into the near wellbore formation. Commonly, squeeze treatments comprise the following stages: a preflush, the main scale inhibitor pill, an overflush and a shut-in. This is followed by the resumption of production in the well. A surfactant preflush is often injected to "condition" the rock (by altering the wettability, resulting in enhanced SI retention). In these treatments, the main SI pill and overflush fluids may be either aqueous or non-aqueous. This paper presents a near-well radial SI squeeze model that can simulate the impact of a surfactant preflush on both inhibitor return concentrations and on well cleanup time. Specifically, we model the effect of surfactant injection on the reduction of residual water and oil saturations, and the results of these changes on enhanced SI adsorption. These may be considered reversible or irreversible processes. Data from scale inhibitor coreflood tests, in which a surfactant preflush was either included or was not, are used to constrain the model. Then we present a sensitivity study of the impact of the surfactant volume injected, and of the effect of surfactant adsorption onto the rock surface, on enhanced SI adsorption. Of particular interest is that enhanced SI adsorption due to the surfactant showed a significant impact on treatment lifetimes. Finally, an example is presented of modelling treatments in wells in an offshore sandstone reservoir where surfactant preflushes were applied. The modelling results are compared with the field return profiles. The value such a model brings to the interpretation of previously conducted squeeze treatments and to the design of new treatments is discussed in terms of optimisation of chemical cost and treatment lifetimes.

    AB - The most common method for preventing downhole scale formation is by applying a scale inhibitor (SI) squeeze treatment. In this process, a SI solution is injected down a producer well into the near wellbore formation. Commonly, squeeze treatments comprise the following stages: a preflush, the main scale inhibitor pill, an overflush and a shut-in. This is followed by the resumption of production in the well. A surfactant preflush is often injected to "condition" the rock (by altering the wettability, resulting in enhanced SI retention). In these treatments, the main SI pill and overflush fluids may be either aqueous or non-aqueous. This paper presents a near-well radial SI squeeze model that can simulate the impact of a surfactant preflush on both inhibitor return concentrations and on well cleanup time. Specifically, we model the effect of surfactant injection on the reduction of residual water and oil saturations, and the results of these changes on enhanced SI adsorption. These may be considered reversible or irreversible processes. Data from scale inhibitor coreflood tests, in which a surfactant preflush was either included or was not, are used to constrain the model. Then we present a sensitivity study of the impact of the surfactant volume injected, and of the effect of surfactant adsorption onto the rock surface, on enhanced SI adsorption. Of particular interest is that enhanced SI adsorption due to the surfactant showed a significant impact on treatment lifetimes. Finally, an example is presented of modelling treatments in wells in an offshore sandstone reservoir where surfactant preflushes were applied. The modelling results are compared with the field return profiles. The value such a model brings to the interpretation of previously conducted squeeze treatments and to the design of new treatments is discussed in terms of optimisation of chemical cost and treatment lifetimes.

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    M3 - Conference contribution

    SN - 9781605604749

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    SP - 2219

    EP - 2231

    BT - Society of Petroleum Engineers - 70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition - Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2008

    ER -

    Vazquez O, Mackay E, Al Shuaili K, Sorbie K, Jordan M. Modeling a surfactant preflush with non-aqueous and aqueous scale inhibitor squeeze treatments. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - 70th European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference and Exhibition - Incorporating SPE EUROPEC 2008. Vol. 4. 2008. p. 2219-2231